Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Sadowski - 1979 - Swing Party

Sadowski
1979
Swing Party



01. Swing Party 7:25
02. Tenderly 5:13
03. Wieczorne Wspomnienie 3:15
04. Mayaka Y 4:15
05. Swing Medley (8:25)
Honey Suckle Rose
Ain't She Sweet
I've Found A New Baby
06. Softly 4:45
07. Różki Dla Maruszki 5:22

Electric Piano, Organ – Krzysztof Sadowski
Guitar – Tomasz Jaśkiewicz


With today’s internet, different regions of the jazz world are so well connected that once obvious regional differences in music are slowly disappearing. Its just too easy for artists all around the world to keep up with what’s happening in NYC, or London or Tokyo, or anywhere else with any kind of jazz scene. Such was not the case in the late 70s, particularly in Communist controlled countries such as Poland, where the latest musical trends from NYC were not as important as daily survival and trying to duck the watchful eye of ‘the authorities’. In 1979, much of the jazz world was mired in fuzak, while the ‘new lion’ movement, and a new downtown NY scene were just around the corner. None of these latest trends were happening in culturally cut-off Poland, where jazz musicians operated without the restrictions of following the latest trends from the US. All of this background helps explain this somewhat ‘odd for 79’ “Swing Party” album by Poland’s Krzysztof Sadowski, on which Sadowski plays old school swing/hard bop/soul jazz with a full stop organ sound that recalls lounge music of the 1950s. It’s a well made and spirited album, but if it had come out in the states in 79, it would have been a complete oddity, which is of course is not necessarily a bad thing.

Long winded cultural explanations aside, “Swing Party” is a solid piece of organ based hard bop groove that recalls pre-Jimmy Smith organists such as Wild Bill Davis and Doc Bagby. Not only is the music tastefully retro, but Sadowski uses a full ‘theatre’ sound on his Hammond, a sound that had disappeared from the international jazz scene a couple decades earlier, replaced by the leaner sound of Jimmy Smith and his many followers. Sadowski is aided on here by four powerful tenor soloists whose soloing styles range from bluesy Sonny Stitt, to more ‘outside’ Coltrane influenced flights. The tunes range from well known standards such as “Tenderly” and “Honey Suckle Rose”, to some neo-bop originals by Sadowski.

If you enjoy 1950s Hammond organ based jazz, this record will not disappoint, Sadowski’s playing is energetic, and the same can be said for his four tenors, all of whom sound like they deserved more recognition outside of Poland. The only thing that will let on that this record was actually recorded in 1979 is the recording date marked on the outside liner notes.

Krzysztof Sadowski And His Group - 1975 - Three Thousands Points

Krzysztof Sadowski And His Group 
1975 
Three Thousands Points



01. Suita Trzy Tysiące = Suite Of Three Thousand 21:36
02. Sorcery 6:04
03. Ten Nasz Zwyczajny Świat (Cz. I I III) = Our Common World 10:00
04. Syrinx 3:46

Bass Guitar – Wojciech Bruślik
Congas – Andrzej Zieliński (5) (tracks: A)
Congas, Percussion – Bożena Bruszewska (tracks: B1 to B3)
Drums – Wojciech Morawski (tracks: B1 to B3), Zbigniew Kitliński (tracks: A)
Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar – Winicjusz Chróst (tracks: B1 to B3)
Flute [El. Flute] – Liliana Urbańska (tracks: A)
Flute, Vocals, Percussion – Liliana Urbańska (tracks: B1 to B3)
Organ [Hammond], Electronics [Ring Modulator], Electric Piano [Fender Piano], Voice – Krzysztof Sadowski
Soprano Saxophone – Veselin Nikolov (tracks: A)
Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone – Tomasz Szukalski (tracks: B1 to B3)
Notes
Side A - Recorded at Polish Radio Studio 28.10.1974 at XVII International Jazz Festival JAZZ JAMBOREE 74.
Side B - Recorded at Warsaw's Philharmonic Hall 17-18.06.1975



Third album by Polish Jazz keyboardist / composer Krzysztof Sadowski recorded with an ensemble called Organ Group, which also included flautist / vocalist Liliana Urbanska, saxophonists Vesselin Nikolov and Tomasz Szukalski, guitarist Winicjusz Chrost, bass guitarist Wojciech Bruslik, drummers Zbigniew Kitlinski and Wojciech Morawski and finally percussionists Andrzej Zielinski and Bozena Bruszewska. The reason for the long lineup is the fact that the album was recorded during two separate sessions with two different lineups.

This album was released at the time as part of the legendary "Polish Jazz" series (as Vol.47) and included originally only four tracks, the first of which gave the album its title and was a twenty one minutes long suite originally found on side A of the LP. The three tracks on side B were shorter and spanned between three to nine minutes in duration. Two of the compositions were originals, both composed by Sadowski; one was a Keith Jarrett tune and one was a Classical piece. This remastered reissue adds three bonus tracks recorded at the Polish Radio.

The music on this album shows Sadowski at full swing as a Jazz-Rock Fusion musician, firmly based in the Fusion idiom, which was pretty well established by then both on the Polish scene and abroad. He expands his arsenal and uses electric piano and early synthesizer (ring modulator) gadgets. The flute parts are more daring and the vocalese more developed, clearly following the work of Urszula Dudziak. Nikolov adds a tinge of Balkan spice and Szukalski blows away like only he could, touching upon Free at times. The rhythmic support is very Rock oriented and the overall sound and feel of the music resembles to some extent the best Fusion ensembles active in the West but maintains an East European identity both harmonically and melodically.

In retrospect the album is a great document of the time at which it was recorded, proving that in spite of the relative separation from what was happing beyond the Iron Curtain, Polish Jazz was responding rapidly to the changes in the Jazz idiom, often with ferocity and ingenuity, which were impossible to hold back by the political regime. The grammar mistake in the English version of the title (preserved for historic consistency) is a nice reminder of Socialist bureaucracy (an insider's joke).

As usual it is my duty to thank GAD Records for taking care of the Polish Jazz heritage, who is sadly a lonely rider on that trail. This superb music definitely needs to be fondly remembered and discovered by new generations!

Super album, possibly one of the best I've heard in the Polish Jazz series thus far.
Here the organist totally embraces the new freedom offered by the Jazz Rock and Jazz Fusion idioms, and offers a muscular live set which is bursting with the kind of boundless creativity that's usually associated with the Krautjazz scene of the early 1970's (Wolfgang Dauner's Et Cetera, Exmagma and the likes) - and the resulting album is worlds apart from his Hammond-led, borderline easy listening 1970 set. Great use of electronic gizmos and probing phallic bass guitar riffing in long tracks where Sadowski and his men are given plenty of space to, you know, exxxploooore.. Add to all this a fantastic recording sound - clear, physically present and very lively. I just wish that this album would have been recorded by a bunch of German unknowns - so that, at least, people would know it and the album would get the love it deserves.

Grupa Organowa Krzysztofa Sadowskiego - 1972 - Na Kosmodromie

Grupa Organowa Krzysztofa Sadowskiego 
1972 
Na Kosmodromie



01. Na Kosmodromie = On The Cosmodrome
02. Alpha Centauri
03. Wam Jest Do Śmiechu, Mnie Nie = You Feel Like Laughing But I Don't
04. Straight Life
05. Dalarna
06. Blues X

Alto Saxophone [Alto Sax], Piano – Włodzimierz Nahorny
Bass Guitar – Paweł Dąbrowski
Congas [Conga] – Józef Gawrych
Drums – Tomasz Butowtt
Organ [Hammond] – Krzysztof Sadowski
Trumpet – Eddie Engels
Vocals, Flute – Liliana Urbańska

Recorded at 03.1972, Warszawa Polskie Nagrania


Second solo album by Polish Jazz keyboardist / composer Krzysztof Sadowski recorded with an ensemble called Organ Group, which also included flautist / vocalist Liliana Urbanska, Dutch trumpeter Eddie Engels, saxophonist Wlodzimierz Nahorny, bass guitarist Pawel Dabrowski, drummer Tomasz Butowtt and congas player Jozef Gawrych.

This album was not released at the time as part of the legendary "Polish Jazz" series, for reasons that are way beyond the scope of this text. The original album included only six tracks, the first of which gave the album its title and was a twenty minutes long six parts suite originally found on side A of the LP. The five tracks on side B were all much shorter. All the compositions were originals, four composed by Sadowski and one each by Nahorny and Engels. This remastered reissue adds three bonus tracks recorded at the Polish Radio.

By the time this album was released the Polish Jazz scene was in a state of upheaval, torn between two extremes: Free Jazz on one side and Jazz-Rock Fusion on the other. Strangely this album presents a bit of both, since although conceptually belonging to the Jazz-Rock Fusion genre it features a few Free Form solos. Obviously Sadowski was shifting his organ playing stylistics from the traditional influences (Jimmy Smith) towards (then) contemporary keyboard approach represented by Herbie Hancock or Weather Report's Joe Zawinul. The use of vocalese, which was one of the trademarks of Polish Jazz at the time, utilized extensively by Urszula Dudziak in Michal Urbaniak's ensemble, is only one of the parallels between these two pioneering Fusion bands active at the time.

The space exploration, which seems a bit strange as a subject matter of a Jazz album, was at the time one of the main pillars of the Socialist propaganda, which excitedly participated in the space race between USSR and USA, with an obvious winning side. Picking such a subject increased of course significantly the possibility to have one's music released by the State controlled solitary record company in existence at the time in Poland (Polskie Nagrania).

In retrospect the album is a great document of the time at which it was recorded, proving that in spite of the relative separation from what was happing beyond the Iron Curtain, Polish Jazz was responding rapidly to the changes in the Jazz idiom, often with ferocity and ingenuity, which were impossible to hold back by the political regime.

As usual it is my duty to thank GAD Records for taking care of the Polish Jazz heritage, who is sadly a lonely rider on that trail. This superb music definitely needs to be fondly remembered and discovered by new generations!

Krzysztof Sadowski - 1970 - Krzysztof Sadowski And His Hammond Organ

Krzysztof Sadowski 
1970
Krzysztof Sadowski And His Hammond Organ



01. Z Malej Chmury Duzy Deszcz / Heavy Rain From A Little Cloud [2:57]
02. Impressions Of The Beatles [8:30]
   a) With A Little Help From My Friends
   b) Yesterday
   c) A Hard Day's Night
03. Kolyszac Sie / Swinging [3:39]
04. Skad My To Znamy / Something Familliar [2:25]
05. Blues Z Moralem / Don't Count On Neal [4:35]
06. Ballada Z Filmu 'Rosemary's Baby' / Main Theme From 'Rosemary's Baby' [4:29]
07. Punkt Docelowy / Aim Point [4:33]
08. Za Pare Dziekow / For Thanks [4:38]

Polish Jazz vol. 21
Recorded in Warsaw, January 1970
Recording director: Wojciech Pietowski
Recording engineer: Halina Jastrzebska-Marciszewska

Krzysztof Sadowski - Hammond Organ (mod. M-120)
Andrzej Dabrowski - drums (1-4)

Jazz Studio Orchestra of the Polish Radio (5-8):
Jan 'Ptaszyn' Wroblewski - leader
Franciszek Kowalski - trumpet
Jozef Debek - trumpet
Jozef Grabarski - trumpet
Franciszek Gorkiewicz - trumpet
Pankracy Zdzitowiecki - trombone
Andrzej Piela - trombone
Stanislaw Kowalczyk - trombone
Kazimierz Morawski - trombone
Wladyslaw Zurkowski - saxophone
Zdzislaw Przybyszewski - saxophone
Albert Pradella - saxophone
Janusz Muniak - saxophone
Bronislaw Suchanek - bass
Janusz Stefanski - drums


Krzysztof Sadowski born in Warsaw, Poland December 15, 1936. He studied piano for eleven years while at school and after graduating from the Warsaw Institute of Technology took up a career in jazz (1957). In the early 1960s he played and recorded with Zbigniew Namyslowski's Jazz Rockers and Jan Wróblewski's Jazz Outsiders (both 1961-2), and worked with Andrzej Kurylewicz and the Swingtet led by the alto saxophonist Jerzy Matuszkiewicz. He achieved considerable success with his own group Bossa Nova Combo (from 1963), with which he toured the USSR (1965) and Scandinavia (1967).

In 1967, influenced by Jimmy Smith, he took up the Hammond organ and formed a hard-bop ensemble, the Organ Group. He also toured and recorded with his wife, the pop singer and flutist Liliana Urbanska. Sadowski has composed many popular hits in Poland, as well as music for films, theater, radio, and television, and two suites, On the Cosmodrome (recorded on Na Kosmodromie, 1972, Muza 7048) and Our Common World. Long time activist and executive of Polish Jazz Society.
The late 1960's ice rink feel of the first side is absolutely addictive, and the big payoff here. And that Beatles medley is (against all odds) actually very cool. Usually I tend to dislike that sort of thing, but imagine : a Beatles medley played on a cranky Hammond organ and a drum kit (only), recorded live with plenty of atmosphere and cool natural reverb to it.. and it almost sounds like ELP doing it, if Keith Emerson were actually blind drunk.. cracking !

Tons of quirkiness to savour all over the LP (although the second (jazzier) side isn't quite as great as the first), this is the kind of "borderline easy listening" stuff that's actually really quite nice.
This is the first album on the legendary Polish Jazz series, which is dedicated to the Hammond organ, the godfather of the electronic keyboards and probably the most significant new instrument, which dominated Jazz and Progressive Rock in the late 1960s and early 1970s (although available since the 1930s). Keyboardist Krzysztof Sadowski belongs to the first post WWII generation of Polish Jazz musicians, debuting in the 1950s and active on the local scene for many years. He combined his love of Jazz and Rock, playing with the leading ensembles of both genres with equal dedication and success. This album presents his Hammond organ performances in two different environments: Side A of the original LP captures him accompanied just by drummer Andrzej Dabrowski and the duo moves through a Rocky set, which includes a Beatles medley. Side B finds him accompanied by the Polish Radio Jazz Studio Orchestra, led by saxophonist / composer Jan "Ptaszyn" Wroblewski and featuring top Polish Jazz players, among them saxophonist Janusz Muniak, bassist Bronislaw Suchanek, drummer Janusz Stefanski and many others. This set is much closer to Jazz and features a beautiful version of Krzysztof Komeda's ballad from "Rosemary's Baby".