Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Led Zeppelin - 1972 - Thunder Down Under

Led Zeppelin
1972
Thunder Down Under 


"The Complete 1972 Australian And New Zealand Recordings" 

“Thunder Down Under” (subtitled The Complete 1972 Australian And New Zealand Recordings) is Empress Valley’s newest title – a massive luxury box set containing 20 CDs and 1DVD of – what was told – a complete and comprehensive collection of all available audio and video from Led Zeppelin’s one and only Australia/New Zealand tour that took place in February of 1972. The box itself looks awesome: glossy cardboard hinged set with five individual gatefold sleeves housed inside. For the front artwork, they’ve used fantastic photo from Melbourne gig, showing members playing on the outdoor stage just as the dark stormy clouds started to appear in the sky and bringing some heavy rain. The back has famous Swan Song logo along with album’s title, usual credits (to Mr. Diamond, whoever he is) and EVSD logos on bottom rears (and with another photo in the background). Each gatefold cover is differently titled and contains two versions of each show, presenting basic edit or source mix (version #A) and alternate edit or source mix (version #B). Each gatefold album utilizes Melbourne photos done during the show and before the rain started to drop.

When it was first announced in October 2013, many negative comments started to pop up and many people complained about its content, saying that yet again thislabel is reissuing the old material known from their previous titles, and stolen a DVD shared by the fans throughout the torrent sites. There were also some problems with flawed discs (actually, disc #16 of Sydney show), and replacement copies were quickly released and sent to everyone, who picked up box at its first selease. After some hesitation I decided to get a copy for myself, and I have to say that even if most of this material already surfaced many years ago, the sound quality and completeness of this collection is undoubtedly far superior to every past title containing any of shows included in this box. There are some rumours saying that this time label used a better tapes and mastering and even if this is not true at all, the overall effect is more than satisfying.

So let’s examine this deluxe set disc by disc, also making some recollections from the past and study this wonderful piece of music. Since we have already plenty of reviews describing each of five shows, I’ll concentrate much on technical aspects, and try to make a comprehensive comparison between titles.

 "Shattering Rock Experience"
Adelaide February 19th, 1972

Version A:

101. Immigrant Song
102. Heartbreaker
103. Black Dog
104. Since I've Been Loving You
105. Stairway To Heaven
106. Going To California
107. That Fs The Way
108. Tangerine
109. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

201. Dazed And Confused
202. Moby Dick
203. Whole Lotta Love


Version B:

301. Immigrant Song
302. Heartbreaker
303. Black Dog
304. Since I've Been Loving You
305. Stairway To Heaven
306. Going To California
307. That Fs The Way
308. Tangerine
309. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

401. Dazed And Confused
402. Moby Dick
403. Whole Lotta Love

This is the famous Adelaide show, and best sounding tape of all five nights that have surfaced so far from this tour. Adelaide was the second stop (after Perth, which has a tape that hasn’t surfaced yet, according to rumour). The show first circulated many years ago on TDOLZ’s “Oooh My Ears Man” and was later reissued by few major labels, of which worth to list are Equinox’s “Live In Adelaide” (also released as stunning 7 CD box set titled [ sic! ] “Thunder Down Under” and collected everything that was available from the tour at that time), Tarantura’s “Voo Doo Drive”, T2K’s “Voo Doo Drive Version 2004” and EVSD’s “Deep Downunder”. Each of these past titles are quite similar in content and quality except for the EVSD’s “Deep Downunder”, which has some edits from between the songs removed out to present a bit more compact listening. EVSD’s newest version included in the box seems to be a little clearer/brighter, has additional several seconds at the very start of tape and overall the recording sounds freshier. Most likely, they’ve used a newly circulated master clone that was traded just few years ago. Between this and first EVSD title I do hear some noticeable difference in depth, and I am calling the box set version a winner.

The show itself is very powerful, with brilliant versions of “Immigrant Song”, “Heartbreaker” (these two songs are unlikely performed with a long break due to a broken string of Jimmy’s guitar and funny comments from some members of the audience, reporting the devastating level of sound (“ooh my years man!” can be heard just right after the first song, when someone was literally blown away by the large amount of decibels), “Stairway To Heaven”, “Dazed And Confused” (a really furious and heavy version, one of the best from 1972 I think), and “Whole Lotta Love medley”. The only minor of this show are numerous cuts and edits throughout the show that caused the dropping of some Plantations from the set, and omitting (probably) some songs that might be played that evening (“Celebration Day” or “What Is And What Should Never Be” and maybe “Communication Breakdown” as the final encore).

Between both versions, version #A contains literally everything that have surfaced on tape while version #B is very similar in content to EVSD’s “Deep Downunder”, and has some edits removed out from compilation. It’s also worth to say that some of edits that plagued original recording are repaired here in a smooth way, making this show even more interesting.


"So Loud, So Hot"
Melbourne February 20th, 1972

Version A:

101. Immigrant Song
102. Heartbreaker
103. Black Dog
104. Since I've Been Loving You
105. Stairway To Heaven
106. Going To California
107. That's The Way
108. Tangerine
109. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

201. Dazed And Confused
202. Moby Dick
203. Whole Lotta Love


Version B:

301. Immigrant Song
302. Heartbreaker
303. Black Dog
304. Since I've Been Loving You
305. Stairway To Heaven
306. Going To California
307. That's The Way
308. Tangerine
309. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

401. Dazed And Confused
402. Moby Dick
403. Whole Lotta Love

The Melbourne show was the first date from the tour that started to circulate amongst the collectors back in the early/mid 1970s, and few vinyl LPs containing first half of the gig in acceptable fair quality appeared just few years after the show. After that, at least three new different source tapes as well as more complete basic source have surfaced, and it’s a hard to say which tape is really complete. At the early 1990s, various labels started to release this show in unique way, and at the end, we have at least a dozen of different titles, and this is probably the most bootlegged date from the entire tour. The most noticeable past versions of this set are: “Acoustically” (TDOLZ), “Count Me Out When It’s Hot” (Cobra), “”Down Under Daze” (Image Quality), “Live In Melbourne” (Equinox; also as 7CD compilation), “Melbourne Masters” (Immigrant), “No Longer Down Under: Live In Melbourne” (Graf Zeppelin), “On Stage Melbourne” (Wendy), “Shivers ‘n’ Shakes” (Red Hot), and “Wet Head Is Dead” (EVSD). Between all of them, no one is truly complete (except for EVSD, Graf and Wendy), and each offers different source mix between at least two or three tape sources. Newly released EVSD title offers almost the same mix as the one found on Graf Zeppelin and Wendy, and is the most complete version of this show so far.

This show was played under very cloudy conditions with rain cutting it short at the end, and was cut short because of thepossibility of electrocution. EVSD used probably four different tapes sources to present a complete concert. Version #A is very similar in content to the versions released by Graf Zeppelin and Wendy (as mentioned) and differs only in very few minor spots (mostly a technical issues). The tape starts with the old “vinyl” source, and then is patched with almost excellent sounding tape, recorded close to the stage and without any serious distortion except for the fact that it sounds a tiny bit weak to me. For the “Rock And Roll” and very start of “Whole Lotta Love” they’ve used another tape that sounds very poorly, lacking complete clarity and it obvious that it was recorded somewhere from the balconies at the end of stadium. Frankly, it lasts maybe within 5 or 6 minutes at all (if count all the minutes used for this particular source) and it doesn’t disturbing overall atmosphere. Very likely, another tape recorder is used for some patches in between the songs but I am not 100 percent sure because when you’re listening multiple source changes, your ears starting to be a bit tired. In opposite, version #B is somewhat much more interesting, at least for someone who’s a mad completist as me. For this version, the label used so called entire “vinyl” source as primary source and used another two (or three?) recorders to patch missing parts in between the songs and for the parts, where basic source tape doesn’t exist (ie. some of “Dazed And Confused”, “Whole Lotta Love” etc.). It is very interesting to hear the whole alternate tape because, even if this source isn’t as clear and dynamic as the one used for the basic version, it allows me to celebrate this date in a much different perspective. Anyway, congrats to EVSD for doing such a great research and – at this point – I must complain on excellent Bootledz site, which states they missed something. (I more believe that some of older titles just faked or repeated some audience parts rather than EVSD accidentally cuts out something, because the same site didn’t say anything bad when referring to Graf Zeppelin/Wendy titles, which are very similar in content to this newly box set and have literally everything in order.) The bad aspect of this version is the fact that they included “Rock And Roll” after “Whole Lotta Love”, which is obviously a big error and I hope that the label will replace this soon with corrected copies of the first disc for version #A.

The show itself starts in with usual medley of “Immigrant Song” and “Heartbreaker” and is followed by good renditions of “Black Dog”, “Since I’ve Been Loving You” and “Stairway To Heaven”. I don’t know why, but for me one of the highlights for this date is acoustic set. The band seems to enjoying themselves much and I have a feeling that night before they were in rush and this night all four members of the group – along with audience – were much more relaxed. The weather started to getting worse as the band went heavily through a great version of “Dazed And Confused”, and near the end it was obvious that the group had to stop the show and wait for a better time. An abrupt version of “Rock And Roll” followed soon and, again, the rain scared everyone during the “Whole Lotta Love” medley, which was shortened “because electricity and water just don’t get together at all”, but even this fact, this concert is really good and worth attention (at least in my humble opinion).


"Biggest Gathering"
Auckland February 25th, 1972

Version A:

101. Immigrant Song
102. Heartbreaker
103. Black Dog
104. Since I've Been Loving You
105. Celebration Day
106. Stairway To Heaven
107. Going To California
108. That's The Way
109. Tangerine
110. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

201. Dazed And Confused
202. What Is And What Should Never Be
203. Moby Dick
204. Rock And Roll
205. Whole Lotta Love
206. Communication Breakdown


Version B:

301. Immigrant Song
302. Heartbreaker
303. Black Dog
304. Since I've Loving You
305. Celebration Day
306. Stairway To Heaven
307. Going To California
308. That's The Way
309. Tangerine
310. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

401. Dazed And Confused
402. What Is And What Should Never Be
403. Moby Dick
404. Rock And Roll
405. Whole Lotta Love
406. Communication Breakdown

This show started to circulate back in 2003 as a single, excellent sounding tape, but was very incomplete (missing many songs). In 2010, an alternate and much more complete tape recorder was found, and this time almost entire show was captured. The show was first released exclusively on two premium labels, Akashic and T2K, under the title “Going To Auckland”. This is followed by another three titles, “Live In New Zealand” (EVSD), “On Stage Auckland” (Wendy) and “No Longer Down Under: Live In Auckland” (Graf Zeppelin); each of them mixed both tape sources and are much similar in content. However, each of them focused on first tape source, using alternate recording only to fill gaps in basic source. Newly released EVSD presents two unique source mixes: version #A is somewhat very similar to their predecessors and version #B includes second tape source as its foundation.

Between all of these titles, the quality is much similar; however, once again, newly EVSD title seems to be sourced from freshier transfers and has more depth to me. Also, version #B is much more interesting because it reflects on alternate recorder that hadn’t been in circulation anywhere but on low gens and here is presented in its entirety, what allows me to explore this show in a different mood.

Auckland date is known especially from the fact of being the first and only appearance of the band in New Zealand. Almost 25,000 fans went to see the group and for this groundbreaking event, Peter Grant hired a Zeppelin Express – an exclusive train to bring fans from Wellington up for the show. This is another excellent performance (probably – mostly because of its quality – shares the same top sound with Adelaide and Sydney), showing a very rare early glimpse of Jimmy Page’s creative prowess on stage and Plant’s explicit praise of the logistics of the show. Probably for the first time during this tour a fast and heavy version of “Celebration Day” was performed and in the middle of “Dazed”, Page incorporated opening riffs of “The Song Remains The Same” (back then the song was yet not finished and was only rehearsed under working title, “The Plumpton And Worcester Races” [sic! ] and existed as a spontaneous, loose jam). “Whole Lotta Love” is my all time favorite from the tour, and furious and heavy “Communication Breakdown” is played as a closer to delight of rowdy audience.


"Pop Goes The Showground"
Sydney February 27th, 1972

Version A:

101. Black Dog
102. Stairway To Heaven
103. Going To California
104. That's The Way
105. Tangerine
106. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp
107. Dazed And Confused
108. What Is And What Should Never Be

201. Moby Dick
202. Rock And Roll
203. Whole Lotta Love
204. Communication Breakdown
205. Organ Solo
206. Thank You


Version B:

301. Black Dog
302. Stairway To Heaven
303. Going To California
304. That's The Way
305. Tangerine
306. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp
307. Dazed And Confused
308. What Is And What Should Never Be

401. Moby Dick
402. Rock And Roll
403. Whole Lotta Love
404. Communication Breakdown
405. Organ Solo
406. Thank You

For the Sydney show two different tape sources are known to exists. The first tape is only a 40-minute fragment containing “Black Dog”, “Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp”, “Rock And Roll” and “Whole Lotta Love” and it was released on Equinox’s “Live In Sydney” (released also as a part of 7CD “Thunder Down Under” set) and on Black Cat’s “Australian Tour Part 1”. The quality is muffled and distant but enough fairly listenable. The second tape surfaced few years after and was taped by Mr. Leo Ishac. It has excellent, wide sound and was taped much close to the stage. Sadly, only equalized transfers are in wide circulation and some of listeners always complained on that fact, saying that the sound is way too much tempered due to process of equalization. On the other hand, this tape source captures almost entire show (minus “Immigrant Song”, “Heartbreaker”, “Since I’ve Been Loving You”, and “Celebration Day”) and was released soon after on “Ayers Rock” by T2K. (Other reports says that the taper recorded entire show, but because of some unknown reasons, he dropped them out from copies he traded over the years.) T2K title is even more tweaked what causing of a rather painful listening experience for this show. Soon after few more labels started to released their own versions, using first (shorter) source to fill gaps in longer tape: “Rumble In Sydney” (Further Along), “Balloon Goes Up On Led Zeppelin” (EVSD), and “On Stage: Sydney” (Wendy). Newly released EVSD title (presented on version #A) uses the same source mix but it seems to be done a little more carefully, keeping everything in right order. Also, for the very first time, the small gap in between “Hello Mary Lou” and “The Rover” in the middle of “Whole Lotta Love’ medley is filled by first tape source, making this ‘marathon’ truly complete. Version #B (similar to Adelaide show) includes an alternate edit, where some of worst cuts are gently eliminated, providing smoother version of this concert.

Sydney show itself is a very strong performance, with many great moments. “Black Dog” is played with fury and impact and “Dazed And Confused” (especially the bowing solo), is a delightful novelty to the provincial punters and this is another great version of this song. “Rock And Roll” is delivered with swaggering fury. Plant reaches the notes the ear expects. Very long and somewhat unique “Whole Lotta Love” and its rock medley, including a fully-realized, instrumental version of “The Rover”, heard years before its official release, is a truly awesome. A great pair of encores (with extremely jammy “Communication Breakdown” and glorious “Thank You”, preceded by organ solo), closing this amazing gig.


"Indoor Farewell"
Brisbane February 29th, 1972

Version A:

101. Immigrant Song
102. Heartbreaker
103. Black Dog
104. Since I've Been Loving You
105. Celebration Day
106. Stairway To Heaven
107. Going To California
108. That's The Way (W/False Start)
109. Tangerine
110. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

201. Dazed And Confused
202. What Is And What Should Never Be
203. Moby Dick
204. Whole Lotta Love


Version B:

301. Immigrant Song
302. Heartbreaker
303. Black Dog
304. Since I've Been Loving You
305. Celebration Day
306. Stairway To Heaven
307. Going To California
308. That's The Way (W/False Start)
309. Tangerine
310. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp

401. Dazed And Confused
402. What Is And What Should Never Be
403. Moby Dick
404. Whole Lotta Love

At the start I need to say that probably this was the biggest surprise for me, having previously only heard the entire Brisbane show and remembering its poor quality, I was even more happy enjoying the fact that EVSD used better sounding transfers up here. Furthermore, all previous titles offered only single source – and – for the very first time large speed issues that plagued both recordings are finally fixed in excellent way.

For many years only first tape source circulated on silvers, making its appearance on Black Cat’s “Australian Tour Part 2” and “Live in Brisbane” (Equinox; released also on 7CD set titled “Thunder Down Under”). Both titles uses poor sounding and somewhat incomplete tape. Newly released EVSD set includes this tape source on version #A as its foundation and filling missing parts with second tape source, that is released on silver for the very first time. Version #B rely on second tape source as basic tape and uses first tape source in parts, where second tape isn’t available. The quality is still muddy and distant but is much more clear and all issues that were presented on past titles are fully repaired, making listening much more comfortable journey. Even the weakness of the sound couldn’t broke my excitement, since Brisbane show is really worth of close attention.

The concert was the final show of the tour and the only indoor gig of all five dates. In fact, this is excellent, high-powered show in front of another rowdy Australian crowd! The opening numbers are excellent and Robert’s singing on “Since I’ve Been Loving You” is pure emotion and one of the best versions from the entire Australian episode. A restless audience stops “That’s The Way” a minute into the song. After Plant’s seating instructions, they start the song again. “Dazed And Confused” is another long version and “Whole Lotta Love’ medley medley is excellent and contains some really rare inclusions. We can only wondering if the group played some encores, since end of tape captured people leaving the hall but if they did any, “Communication Breakdown” might be the answer (judging their two previous shows, they used this song as a definitive set closer).


Summary: As for any other massive sets, this title is recommended especially for more serious collectors out there. Two versions for each of shows might be a boring thing for less advanced listeners and for those, who cannot afford it, at least one single title for each show can be adapted. The minor flaws here and there (mostly attributed to the Sydney tape and unavailability of raw unprocessed transfer for the Leo Ishac’s source tape) are vastly overshadowed by the excellent presentation and editing work of the sources presented in this box set. Just about all the shows presented here are in either same or improvement in terms of sound quality and completeness over previous releases with EVSD taking full advantage of the very careful mastering technique (making all these shows sounding fantastic, especially Melbourne, where multiple source changes are done in a truly professional way). Furthermore, this box set will probably become highly collectable in years to come, not only because the fact of being strictly limited to few hundred copies only but mainly because of its content as the most complete and comprehensive collection of all these shows (until new tape sources are about to surface someday).

Joel Stephan Marcel Vandroogenbroeck R.I.P.


We start the year with sad news


Playing some records and having, having a drink and wishing the man eternal light.



Pink Floyd - 1980 - Tearing Down The Coliseum Wall

Pink Floyd
1980
Tearing Down The Coliseum Wall


The Godfather Box – G.R. BOX 05

Pink Floyd played five sold out nights at the Nassau Coliseum on the short but expensive Wall tour in 1980 and 1981.  All five were taped from the audience with the final night on February 28th being the most popular show to appear on silver releases.

On Tearing Down The Wall the Godfather label present the three rare middle shows, February 25th, 26th & 27th.  The February 26th show was included on the four disc set on Sigma Your Favorite Disguise (Sigma 23), but the second and fourth concerts from the New York shows are making their silver pressed debuts in this box set.

The New York concerts were heavily promoted on metropolitan radio, creating a media blitz.  All the shows were sold out within five hours.  Scalpers were fetching as much as $100 for orchestra seats.  At one of the shows 150 fans destroyed the glass in the box office and ran into the Coliseum, blending in with the crowd.

Newspapers published serious articles about the spectacle, offering mixed opinions.  Martha Hume in the Daily News wrote that “cannot figure out just what people see in a menopausal British rock band that seems to be contemplating the Guyana solution as the nearest exit from life.”

On the other hand, John Rockwell, reviewing the shows in the New York Times, opined that “The Wall show remains a milestone in rock history though and there’s no point in denying it. Never again will one be able to accept the technical clumsiness, distorted sound and meager visuals of most arena rock concerts as inevitable” and concluded that the Wall show will be the “touchstone against which all future rock spectacles must be measured.”

After the final gig the band hosted a party attended by Carly Simon, Mark Knopfler and other luminaries.  Andy Warhol, when asked if he liked the concert, replied “I always felt that the Velvet Underground was a good psychedelic group.”

With all the attention being paid to Pink Floyd with the recent release of the big “immersion” and “deluxe” versions of their catalog, it’s also an opportunity to discover more of the unofficial tapes in circulation.  And as good as the February 28th show is (and sounds), it’s nice to hear the other New York shows in the best available sound quality.

The packaging is also excellent.  It includes a mini tour program, liner notes, and a button commemorating the gigs. Tearing Down The Coliseum wall is the most impressive Pink Floyd release since Behind The Wall (Stonehenge Records STBX 022/23/24) came out in 1993, which contained the Feb. 28th show along with the Los Angeles rehearsals and Roger Waters live tracks from the early nineties.



February 25, 1980
Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, NY

101. MC: Atmosphere
102. In The Flesh
103. The Thin Ice
104. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 1
105. The Happiest Days Of Our Lives
106. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2
107. Mother
108. Goodbye Blue Sky
109. Empty Spaces
110. What Shall We Do Now?
111. Young Lust
112. One Of My Turns
113. Don't Leave Me Now
114. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 3
115. The Last Few Bricks
116. Goodbye Cruel World

201. Hey You
202. Is There Anybody Out There?
203. Nobody Home
204. Vera
205. Bring The Boys Back Home
206. Comfortably Numb
207. The Show Must Go On
208. MC: Atmosphere
209. In The Flesh
210. Run Like Hell
211. Waiting For The Worms
212. Stop
213. The Trial
214. Outside The Wall


The sound quality for the second New York show is very good to borderline excellent.  There is slight damage to the source tape at the beginning and slight cuts in “Another Brick In The Wall Part 2.”  Except for some conversations by the recorder, it captures the  music very well with an emphasis on the lower end.

In fact, one funny moment occurs during “Nobody Home.”  About two and a half minutes into the song a female security guard asks our taper, “Is that a pipe you’ve got there?”  The taper ignores her, so she asks him again.  He responds, “No, it’s a microphone.”  Despite the admission she lets him continue to tape. 

The February 25th show begins with Gary Yudman’s little speech.  In addition to the usual statements, he adds:  “I do have a couple of ‘good luck’ telegrams you might be interested in hearing from.  We have a telegram from President Carter.  It says, ‘You guys blow my mind.  Stop.  Rosalyn too.  Stop.  Rosalyn ooo. Stop.  Ooo, oo, Rosalyn.  Stop.’  Signed Lover of the Year.  We have one from Bob Dylan.  From Bob Dylan it says, ‘You can call me Bobby, and you can call me Zimmy, and you can call me absent, cause I won’t be there.’  Let me see, uh, we have one from Neil Young.  It says, ‘My, my, hey, hey, hope your show goes well today.'”

The opening is very energetic with the highlight “Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2,” the first real hit from the album.  The audience become so enthusiastic that someone throws fireworks on she stage at the very beginning of “Goodbye Blue Sky.”  Roger and the band keep their cool thankfully (unlike their visit to Madison Square Garden in 1977) and continue the song without incident. 

“You having a good time?  Goody, goody, goody!”  Waters says before introducing “Young Lust.”  Both Gilmour and Wright on keyboards sound like they’re having much fun in this track.  But something seems wrong with Waters’ microphone during “Don’t Leave Me Now.”  His vocals sound much heavier and he’s out of sync with the music.

The first half ends with the instrumental “Last Few Brick.”  The piece goes on longer than usual because the road crew weren’t finished assembling the wall.  Wright continues the piece with a spacey bit of keyboards reminiscent of “Shine On You Crazy Diamond” and Gilmour uses an echo effect on his guitar giving it a Queen sounding timbre.  Waters sings the gentle “Goodbye Cruel World” before they take a twenty minute intermission. 

The audience are a typical noisy Long Island audience excited to see the band play in the Coliseum for the first time in five years.  So much so that Rogers takes the unprecedented step (for a Wall show) to addressing the audience before they start the second half.  He tells them “I’m sure there are a lot of people here who want to listen to the quiet bits.  So if you could shout and holler in the loud bits and keep quiet in the quiet bits.  That would be wonderful.  That’s all I gotta say.  We’ll have a good time and enjoy the second half.”  (Similar sentiments to what he said in the Garden on the last tour).

“Comfortably Numb” is the obvious highlight of the second half.  Before “Run Like Hell” Waters asks the audience, “Do you our pig? Yeah! He’s not a very nice pig, but he’s a BIG pig! This next tune, I’d like to dedicate to all the paranoids in the audience. I’m sure there’s a few in the house, and it’s called ‘Run Like Hell.'”  It starts off with several strange grunts as Waters shouts “DISCO!”

Richard Wright plays a very loud organ in “Waiting For The Worms” and the Long Island give a loud approval to the trial and the wall’s destruction.  During “Outside The Wall” Waters uses poor clarinet embouchure and hits two nasty screeches. 

“Thank you, good night” he said to a rapidly cheering audience after the triumphant second night in New York.




February 26, 1980
Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, NY

301. MC: Atmosphere
302. In The Flesh
303. The Thin Ice
304. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 1
305. The Happiest Days Of Our Live
306. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2
307. Mother
308. Goodbye Blue Sky
309. Empty Spaces
310. What Shall We Do Now?
311. Young Lust
312. One Of My Turns
313. Don't Leave Me Now
314. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 3
315. The Last Few Bricks
316. Goodbye Cruel World

401. Hey You
402. Is There Anybody Out There?
403. Nobody Home
404. Vera
405. Bring The Boys Back Home
406. Comfortably Numb
407. The Show Must Go On
408. MC: Atmosphere
409. In The Flesh
410. Run Like Hell
411. Waiting For The Worms
412. Stop
413. The Trial
414. Outside The Wall


The third night in New York was released several years ago on silver on Your Favorite Disguise, a four disc set by Sigma which includes the superior sounding February 28th show.  Plomerus speculated that was a two source edit given the fluctuations in the sound found throughout the show. 

Godfather use only one source.  They use the superior recording which, according to the source, was recorded on the middle right hand side of the stage with a “Nakamichi 550 using (2) Nak 700 shotguns w/nak700 omni blend” mics.  It picks up all the detail from the stage and with a gorgeous mix with the audience reaction producing a beautiful live sound.

There are cuts at the beginning of each half, cutting off much of Gary Yudman’s initial atmos and the first ten seconds of “Hey You.”  Sigma is slightly more complete because they have these bits, but Godfather sounds much better and engaging.

The band are tight and the audience are even more loud and demonstrative than the previous.  In “Another Brick In The Wall Part I” Wright really tickles the ivory on the piano and plays the same spacy keyboard interlude found in “Shine On You Crazy Diamond Parts 6-9.”  The psychedelia sound scape is rudely interrupted by the helicopter and the Scottish school teacher.

It builds up nicely to “Another Brick In The Wall Part 2,” motivating the audience to dance in the aisle (so it seems).  The audience are particularly vocal during the performance of “Mother.”  Waters’ lines about “Mother, should I run for president?” draws cheers since February 1980 was the start of the presidential primaries.  (New Hampshire held their elections this night with incumbent president Jimmy Carter beating Edward Kennedy for the Democratic vote and Ronald Reagan beating George H.W. Bush for the Republican).

The next line “Mother, should I trust the government” draws an even louder response, as loud as Bob Dylan received for the line “Sometimes even the president of America must sometimes stand naked” in “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” during his 1974 tour with The Band.  The cheering, and the elections in November, illustrate the frustration with Carter’s presidency.

After “What Shall We Do Now?” Waters give a curt “This is called ‘Young Lust.'”  The rest of the first half continues without incident.

“Hey You” draws a big cheer, as does the glimpse of New York television in “Nobody Home.”  The highlight of the show, and perhaps of the entire box, is this performance of “Comfortably Numb.”  Everything sounds very strong in the mix including an additional, faint guitar melody.  Waters’ vocals are biting and Gilmour’s sound very sweet and convincing.

Before “Run Like Hell” Waters asks, “Do you like our pig? We like him.  He hasn’t got a lot of class but there’s a lot of him.”  He gives his dedication to “all the paranoids in the audience” and yells at the pig “Home, piggy, go home. Raus!! Schnell! (German for “OUT!  QUICKLY!”)

There is a malfunction with the backing tape on “The Trial.”  It takes a few embarrassing seconds to correct (seconds which feel like hours).  Waters’ PA also malfunctions for a bit, really messing up the track.  But “Outside The Wall” goes off much better than the previous night and, overall, another great show for New York.



February 27, 1980
Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, NY

501. MC: Atmosphere
502. In The Flesh
503. The Thin Ice
504. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 1
505. The Happiest Days Of Our Lives
506. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2
507. Mother
508. Goodbye Blue Sky
509. Empty Spaces
510. What Shall We Do Now?
511. Young Lust
512. One Of My Turns
513. Don't Leave Me Now
514. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 3
515. The Last Few Bricks
516. Goodbye Cruel World

601. Hey You
602. Is There Anybody Out There?
603. Nobody Home
604. Vera
605. Bring The Boys Home
606. Comfortably Numb
607. The Show Must Go On
608. MC: Atmosphere
609. In The Flesh
610. Run Like Hell
611. Waiting For The Worms
612. Stop
613. The Trial
614. Outside The Wall


Wednesday, February 27 is the fourth and penultimate night of the New York concerts.  This concert was filmed for potential use in The Wall film.  It has never been released officially, not even in the new The Wall – Immersion box coming out in February 2012 (thirty-two years and one day after this performance).  But it has been released unofficially, most recently on U.S. Wall (No Label).

Three unique audience tapes exist and are in circulation for this concert. Godfather use the first of the three.  It is the most complete of the three, having no cuts during the performance.  It is good sounding but muffled and fuzzy at points.  The beginning is worse, but it clears up by the middle of the show.

Of the three shows in the box, this is the most “average.”  It is good, but lacks the excitement, energy or inventiveness of the others.  Perhaps the band were self-conscious before the cameras?

The audience obviously loves the performance, and become loud during “Another Brick In The Wall Part 2.”  Gilmour misses the cue for the guitar solo, but Mason keeps the beat going for an extra measure until the guitarist can figure out what to do. 

“Mother,” as usual during these New York shows, receives a lot of applause in response to the words with the biggest reactions to the lines about trusting the government.  Gilmour plays a strange little “mandolin” over the main melody.

Before “Young Lust”  Waters asks “you having a good time so far?  Oh good.  That’s absolutely marvelous” in a sarcastic tone.  The audience are very quiet during “One Of My Turns,” concentrating on the narrative.

At the start of the second half of the show they play “Hey You,”  Gilmour has a laughing fit while singing the track.  “Is There Anybody Out There?” the radio picks up a New York Islanders hockey game, drawing slight cheers (this is when they were actually good). 

The same game is picked up before “Nobody Home.”  Tuning into local radio was a gimmick from the In The Flesh tour in 1977 and it works very well in metropolitan areas with many radio stations.

Before “Run Like Hell” Waters shouts: “Do you like our pig? He’s not a very nice pig, but he’s a big pig. There’s more to our pig than meets the eye. Go home pig, go on, fuck off!”  The audience laughs hard as Waters continues, “Puffed up, overblown, pork-eyed garlic fat thing, go on, go. This next tune I’d like to dedicate to all the paranoid folk, in the audience tonight, of whom I’m sure there are many.”

“Waiting For The Worms” builds up tremendous amounts of excitement in the audience.  “The Trial” goes off without a hitch (unlike the previous night), and Waters hits some screeches on his clarinet on “Outside The Wall.”

The tape ends with several minutes of the audience leaving the coliseum to the post-concert music piped in over the PA system including the Glenn Miller recordings of “Pennsylvania 6-5000” and “In The Mood.”

Overall this is a very enjoyable performance which lacks a bit of the excitement of the others nights in this collection, but is very tight.

Tearing Down The Coliseum Wall is a tremendous release by Godfather for the art design and mastering of the tapes.  Although the February 28th show is the definitive New York Wall show is not included (it’s been out many times before and Godfather wants to tread new ground), all these shows have very good sound and are very exciting to hear.  And the packaging makes this one of the most beautiful releases of the year.



BONUS:

February 24, 1980
Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, NY

101. MC: Atmosphere
102. In The Flesh
103. The Thin Ice
104. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 1
105. The Happiest Days Of Our Lives
106. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2
107. Mother
108. Goodbye Blue Sky
109. Empty Spaces
110. What Shall We Do Now?
111. Young Lust
112. One Of My Turns
113. Don't Leave Me Now
114. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 3
115. The Last Few Bricks
116. Goodbye Cruel World

201. Hey You
202. Is There Anybody Out There?
203. Nobody Home
204. Vera
205. Bring The Boys Home
206. Comfortably Numb
207. The Show Must Go On
208. MC: Atmosphere
209. In The Flesh
210. Run Like Hell
211. Waiting For The Worms
212. Stop
213. The Trial
214. Outside The Wall


February 28, 1980
Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, NY

101. MC: Atmosphere
102. In The Flesh
103. The Thin Ice
104. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 1
105. The Happiest Days Of Our Lives
106. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2
107. Mother
108. Goodbye Blue Sky
109. Empty Spaces
110. What Shall We Do Now?
111. Young Lust
112. One Of My Turns
113. Don't Leave Me Now
114. Another Brick In The Wall, Part 3
115. The Last Few Bricks
116. Goodbye Cruel World

201. Hey You
202. Is There Anybody Out There?
203. Nobody Home
204. Vera
205. Bring The Boys Home
206. Comfortably Numb
207. The Show Must Go On
208. MC: Atmosphere
209. In The Flesh
210. Run Like Hell
211. Waiting For The Worms
212. Stop
213. The Trial
214. Outside The Wall