Sunday, December 2, 2018

Bobby Rodriguez - 1973 - Simply Macrame

Bobby Rodriguez 
1973
Simply Macrame


01. Simply Macrame 16:20
02. Straight, No Changes 4:07
03. Caramba 6:43
04. Judy's In Love 6:05

Alto Saxophone – Hush Preston, Jim Edwards
Alto Saxophone [Solos] – Joe Curazzato
Baritone Saxophone – Jim Sharp
Bass – Ron Chretin
Congas – Kuumba
Drums – Ndugu
Percussion – Angel, Tony Rodarte
Piano – Sam Garcia
Tenor Saxophone – Tony Garcia
Tenor Saxophone, Flute [Solo] – Ray Bojorquez
Trombone – Jeff Dean, Mike Vladcavich, Peter Beltran
Trombone [Solo] – Doug Wintz
Trumpet – Brian Hori, Michael Mercado, Tom Sawzee, Tony Farrell
Trumpet, Producer – Bobby Rodriguez
Vocals – Betty Macias

Recorded: November 21, 1973


Incredible 16 minute latin jazz variation on Freddie Hubbard's 'Little Sunflower', featuring a heavyweight line up including James Mtume & Ndugu Chancler

“Wow, wow, wow, wow, this is just incredible! I think that everybody should have this record, what an incredible version of Little Sunflower” Gilles Peterson, BBC Radio 6 / Worldwide FM


Originally recorded and privately pressed in 1973 on Jazz-Men Records, “Simply Macrame” contains a 16 minute rendition of Freddie Hubbard’s ‘Little Sunflower’, taking it to an entirely new landscape complete with vocals from Betty Macias.
The young Bobby Rodriguez really shows off his skills as a big-band leader, with a total of 21 musicians credited in the liner notes. Although this record is rare, Bobby Rodriguez is not unknown and remains quite active in the music scene in his hometown of Los Angeles. In 2000 his “Latin Jazz Explosion” album was nominated for a Grammy, and is presently director of Latin Jazz Music and Jazz Trumpet at UCLA, UCI, and Pasadena City College.

Sand - 2016 - His First Steps

Sand
2016 
His First Steps






01. Helly Copter 11:27
02. An Old Loggerhead 10:02
03. When The May Rain Comes 2:51
04. Standing On The Corner (Mono) 4:19
05. Julia 9:21

Recorded 1972-3.


In 1974, an obscure German band called Sand released their debut LP, Golem. Like a lot of psychedelic and experimental rock albums from that period, the album obtained a cult following over time, and was reissued a few times during this decade. This album was recorded in 1972, and is basically an early version of Golem. Listening to it, it’s almost astonishing at how much it anticipates people like Coil and Current 93. C93 actually covered one of the songs on this album and Nurse with Wound’s Steven Stapleton did the cover art. The first side features 2 10-minute tracks; “Helly Copter” is very hypnotic and kind of demonic. “An Old Loggerhead” is also, but it’s a lot more sparse and it seems like there’s a lot less happening. The first two songs on second side are comparatively more poppy, but only compared to the first side. “When the May Rain Comes” (the song C93 covered) is the shortest and folkiest song, and yes, it sounds a lot like the apocalyptic folk style that C93 would become infamous for. “Standing On the Corner” is a bit more upbeat, at least musically, with a puttering drum machine and repetitive lyrics about “standing on the corner with my feet soaking wet”. “Julia” is longer and sort of feels like a sort of opera, with 2 distinct parts. Very hypnotic and slowly progressing, with sparse, eerie melodies and echoed vocals. The album feels like a sort of lost chapter in psych/Krautrock history.

Sand - 2014 - North Atlantic Raven

Sand
2014
North Atlantic Raven


01. Golemanation
02. Dance On
03. High Tension

Unreleased 4th album from 70's
Limited and numbered edition of 500 copies

Johannes Vester: vocals, guitar, VCS3
Ludwig Papenberg: congas, VCS3, drum box, guitar, organ
Ulrich Papenberg: bass.

Guests on "High Tension":
Klaus Pankau, electric guitar
Micky Westphal, bass
Dietmar Burmeister, drums

Cover painting by Babs Santini.



The once croaking raven now silently flew over the ocean, higher and higher.
Where are you rolling, sun-ball, and why don’t you fall?
The sandy Golem crumbled into dust. His brave struggle against the mighty forces of darkness soon was dissolving in voiceless space.

Previously unreleased album by German trio Sand, composed and recorded in 1973, '75, and '76. The once-croaking raven now flies silently over the ocean, higher and higher. Where are you rolling, sun-ball, and why don't you fall? The sandy Golem crumbled into dust. His brave struggle against the mighty forces of darkness soon dissolved in voiceless space. There is something magical and inexplicable in creation, and Sand absolutely manifest these mysterious phenomena. Storytellers, musicians, shamans, geniuses -- Sand were known, at the end of the '60s, as P.O.T. (Part of Time). Then Sand -- Ludwig Papenberg, his brother Ulrich Papenberg, and Johannes Vester -- developed a more avant-gardist, proto-industrial, visionary, experimental approach, becoming a truly unique entity in the history of music. Not dependent on a classic krautrock style, Sand is nevertheless part of this movement of German cosmic/psychedelic bands, in addition to being the originators of proto industrial musics. 

Sand - 2012 - Sylph Ballet

Sand 
2012
Sylph Ballet


01. Coastal Nightwalk
02. Amelith/Room
03. Dawn Levitation
04. The Morning Has Blown You Away
05. Giving Golem Respiration
06. Her Broken Wing – Passing My Window
07. Upon Eleven Black Horses
08. A Cosy Trance Of Hibernation
09. Water

Johannes Vester: lyrics, vocals, guitar, VCS3, harmonium, collateral piano,
Ludwig Papenberg: guitar, drums, collateral piano, VCS3
Ulrich Papenberg: bass, generator

Guest: 
Jörg Welz: grand piano


Still living in the mythical landscapes SAND not only created Golem who was a being of the earth. Something else pulsated with a different energy of oscillation. The invisible beings of the air performed their dances. The Golem was large, mighty and of compact matter. He needed an external spirit to be navigated. Sylph creatures moved with the clouds and the wind – from gentle breezes to violent storms, always sensitive to the chimes of the motions. The sylphs are the children of the moonlight as well as the elves with broken wings.The sylph ballet is riding upon ethereal horses and its airy spirit comes true in dawn levitation.

Previously unreleased album from the '70s by German trio Sand. Still living in the mythical landscapes, Sand not not only created Golem (ROTOR 006CD/LP/BLU-LP/PIC-LP, 1974), who was a being of the earth. Something else pulsated with a different energy of oscillation. The invisible beings of the air performed their dances. The Golem was large, mighty and of compact matter. He needed an external spirit to be navigated. Sylph creatures moved with the clouds and the wind -- from gentle breezes to violent storms, always sensitive to the chimes of the motions. The sylphs are the children of the moonlight as well as the elves with broken wings. The Sylph Ballet is riding upon ethereal horses and its airy spirit comes true in dawn levitation. There is something magical and inexplicable in creation, and Sand absolutely manifest these mysterious phenomena. Storytellers, musicians, shamans, geniuses -- Sand were known, at the end of the '60s, as P.O.T. (Part of Time). Then Sand -- Ludwig Papenberg, his brother Ulrich Papenberg, and Johannes Vester -- developed a more avant-gardist, proto-industrial, visionary, experimental approach, becoming a truly unique entity in the history of music. Not dependent on a classic krautrock style, Sand is nevertheless part of this movement of German cosmic/psychedelic bands, in addition to being the originators of proto-industrial musics. 

Sand - 2011 - Desert Navigation

Sand
2011
Desert Navigation


01. Vulture I 5:39
02. Touch The Tyrants 6:21
03. Tendrara 6:20
04. Desert Storm 10:44
05. Burning House 2:06
06. Vulture II 3:55

Johannes Vester - lyrics, vocals, synthesizers, guitar, organ, harmonium
Ludwig Papenberg - synthesizers, organ, generator, guitar, bongos
Ulrich Papenberg - bass

Guests:
Christa Schunke - chorus
Claudia Utke - synthesizer
Dietmar Burmeister - drums
Jörg Hahnfeld - acoustic guitar
Klaus Pankau - electric and acoustic guitars
Martine Rossi-Merue - vocals
Michael (Micky) Westphal - bass.



Sand dissolved sometime around 75', but history prooved they had much more to offer than one album.This unreleased compilation of recordings includes stuff for a never released second album as well as later compositions of Ludwig Papenberg and Johannes Vester.The music is somewhere in the middle between Kraut eletronics and Psych/Folk with an experimental edge.Lots of synthesizers, oscillators, cosmic effects to go along with psychedelic drumming, wordless voices and folky explorations.A bit more diverse than the debut and definitely more convincing.Fans of Experimental/Kosmische Prog will enjoy this one mostly.

Previously unreleased album by German trio Sand, recorded 1973-1982. Live events in the quarry and an archaic sound formed the background music of the young atomic age. In the meantime, after endless trance garage sessions, Sand drifted from the mythical landscapes to Berlin and mingled with various oriental influences. Vultures were scudding along the urban canyons while burning houses illuminated the skyline. Sand navigated in obscure spheres and discovered Tendrara. There is something magical and inexplicable in creation, and Sand absolutely manifest these mysterious phenomena. Storytellers, musicians, shamans, geniuses -- Sand were known, at the end of the '60s, as P.O.T. (Part of Time). Then Sand -- Ludwig Papenberg, his brother Ulrich Papenberg, and Johannes Vester -- developed a more avant-gardist, proto-industrial, visionary, experimental approach, becoming a truly unique entity in the history of music. Not dependent on a classic krautrock style, Sand is nevertheless part of this movement of German cosmic/psychedelic bands, in addition to being the originators of proto-industrial musics. Johannes Vester: lyrics, vocals , synthesizers, guitar, organ, harmonium. Ludwig Papenberg: synthesizers, organ, generator, guitar, bongos. Ulrich Papenberg: bass. Guests: Christa Schunke, chorus; Claudia Utke, synthesizer; Dietmar Burmeister, drums; Jörg Hahnfeld, acoustic guitar; Klaus Pankau, electric and acoustic guitars; Martine Rossi-Merue, vocals; Michael (Micky) Westphal, bass. Remastered by Hervé de Keroullas, 2008. Graphic Design by Frédéric Tacer, 2011. Cover painting by Babs Santini, 2009. CD in six-panel digipak.

2017 remastered edition, with new standard glossy jackets. Texture and feeling of 1975 with boosted audiophile sound quality. Black vinyl version. Previously unreleased album by German trio Sand, recorded 1973-1982. Live events in the quarry and an archaic sound formed the background music of the young atomic age. In the meantime, after endless trance garage sessions, Sand drifted from the mythical landscapes to Berlin and mingled with various oriental influences. Vultures were scudding along the urban canyons while burning houses illuminated the skyline. Sand navigated in obscure spheres and discovered Tendrara. There is something magical and inexplicable in creation, and Sand absolutely manifest these mysterious phenomena. Storytellers, musicians, shamans, geniuses -- Sand were known, at the end of the '60s, as P.O.T. (Part of Time). Then Sand -- Ludwig Papenberg, his brother Ulrich Papenberg, and Johannes Vester -- developed a more avant-gardist, proto-industrial, visionary, experimental approach, becoming a truly unique entity in the history of music. Not dependent on a classic krautrock style, Sand is nevertheless part of this movement of German cosmic/psychedelic bands, in addition to being the originators of proto-industrial musics. Live events in the quarry and an archaic sound formed the background music of the young atomic age. In the meantime the desert storm accumulated in endless trance garage sessions. Then Sand drifted from the mythical landscapes to Berlin and mingled with various oriental influences. Vultures were scudding along the urban canyons whilst burning houses illuminated the skyline. Sand navigated in obscure spheres and discovered Tendrara.

Sand - 1974 - Golem

Sand 
1974
Golem


01. Helicopter 13:40
02. The Old Loggerhead 8:20
03. May Rain 4:30
04. On The Corner 4:30
05. Sarah 10:40
a. Part I (Passacaille)
b. Part II (Per Aspera Ad Astra)


Bass Guitar, Percussion, Chorus – Ulrich Papenberg
Electric Piano [Electronic Piano] – Christian von der Schulenburg (tracks: B3)
Guitar [Guitars], Organ, Electronic Drums, Chorus – Ludwig Papenberg
Lead Vocals, Synthesizer [VCS 3 Synthesizer], Chorus – Hannes Vester

Recorded By – Klaus Schulze


Golem is widely regarded to be a lost psychedelic masterpiece among the sorts of people who are interested in such things, numbering David Tibet, Stephen Stapleton, and Julian Cope among its more outspoken champions.  In fact, Current 93 even covered "May Rain" on Thunder Perfect Mind.  Now, 36 years after it initially appeared, Golem has finally been reissued for the first time in its original form (though it previously surfaced as part of Durtro's Ultrasonic Seraphim retrospective in 1996). I don't think I'd quite call it a masterpiece myself, but it is definitely one of the more memorably bizarre albums to emerge from the krautrock milieu and that is certainly no small feat.
Curiously, both the cause of Sand's dissatisfaction with Golem and one of the primary reasons for its semi-legendary status share an identical root: producer Klaus Schulze. At the time, Schulze and engineer Manfred Schunke were developing a proto-surround sound recording technique called Artificial Head Stereo Sound and this was one of the first albums to make use of the new technology (and the only one that is still remembered today).  On the downside, the technique apparently compromised the music's dynamics, much to Sand's lasting chagrin.  However, the upside is that Golem sounds crazily vibrant and hallucinatory on headphones and whatever dynamic disasters befell the album are probably unnoticeable to anyone who was not in the band.  I have to side with Klaus on this one.

While the production is definitely a key element to the album's appeal, Sand were also pretty weird in their own right.  For one thing, only two of the three band members (the Papenburg brothers) were "serious" musicians, as the band became Sand after Part of Time's organist and drummer quit.  As such, these songs generally have a very skeletal and oft-dirgelike structure, often just a bass and a synthesizer, or a bass and a guitar.  Despite his lack of instrumental prowess, however, vocalist Johann Vester was the band's resident visionary, contributing both tripped-out atmospheric synth burbling and whooshing as well as some very impressively weird and evocative lyrics (a feat made more impressive by the fact that he was a German singing in English).

It is easy to hear why this appealed to David Tibet so much when he found it in Stephen Stapleton's record collection that fateful day, as Vester seems something like a mad prophet ranting poetically though a gurgling, panning, swooping, and flanging haze.  In fact, it even seems like some moments on this album may have had a direct influence on what Current 93 eventually became, like the moment in "Helicopter" where Johannes portentously sings "And the air is dark and strange and cold…it's moving there," which triggered a flicker of "All the Stars Are Dead Now" in my mind.  At the very least, Golem certainly falls awkwardly into the pantheon of apocalyptic folk that predated Current 93's eventual perfection of the form.

The biggest downside to Golem for me is that Johannes Vester is a rather unique vocalist, to put it politely.  I think he sounds a lot like an agitated leprechaun at times during "Helicopter," but Julian Cope has more insightfully described his unique aesthetic as "post-apocalyptic space-cockney."  My other problem is the song "On the Corner," which clumsily wrecks the lysergic gnomes-and-ghosts-and-dark-forests vibe of the album with some utterly baffling hippified blues rock and over-exuberant conga playing from Schulze.  Even the lyrics are mundane—I don’t get it at all.   Also, I think the Current 93 version of May Rain hopelessly eclipses the original, but I suppose that is an inherent hazard in letting David Tibet cover one of your songs. However, none of those grievances change the fact that this was (and is) a deeply aberrant and unique record:  Golem is the sound of cutting edge analog mindfuckery circa 1974 and no one else has quite made anything like it.  I can't call the experiment a complete success by any means, but "batshit crazy, but flawed" still trumps most other music in my book.


Review by Julian Cope:
When Gento and Yogi finally fled back to their homes in Bodenwerder, in Lower Saxony, they were looking for normality and safety. As members of the burgeoning Krautrock scene, they had loved their Cologne show supporting Can, and believed that their band Part Of Time could only become bigger and better. But they were all from the fanstastic land of Baron Munchhausen, a beautiful rural area whose biggest local town was the fairy-tale Hamelin, where once had come the famed and legendary Pied Piper. And though each was intrigued by these industrial cities in which they had been called upon to perform, they had all grown up playing in the woods and ancient quarries of the mysterious Weser Valley. Yes, they wanted to play the new rock’n’roll, but all were still mistrustful of the druggies and weirdos which permeated their new lives - full of student demonstration, anti-Cold War attitude and communal living. And so, when the rest of Part of Time decided to move to Berlin, both Gento and Yogi freaked out and quit the band.
Of course, this left the Papenburg brothers in a real fix. Both Ludwig and Ulrich were excellent musicians, but how should they proceed? Their lead singer Johannes Vester was a visionary lyricist, but he was no musician. True, he contributed a mean short wave radio to the soup of their live sound, but it was hardly going to help now that the drummer and organist had both run back to the forest.
However, this was the experimental Krautrock scene of 1972, and anything was possible. Can’s manager, Manfred Schmidt, had been enormously impressed by Part of Time’s performance in Cologne. He had sat up half the night listening to Johannes Vester’s notions of where experimental rock’n’roll should go next. And he had introduced Vester and the two Papenburg brothers to Klaus Schulze, who had in turn encouraged their plans to move to his own city Berlin, where anything was possible, and the weirder the better.

And so Sand was born - a cosmic and drummerless trio with a lead singer who played VCS3 synthesizer and sang mysterious and pedantic English lyrics in a voice like a Frisian Puritan reared on Melanie Kafka and David Bowie. Sample lyric? "He is an old loggerhead - actually long ago he is dead." Reviewer’s comment: Nuff said.
On arrival in Berlin, these three longhairs beat a path to Klaus Schulze’s front door and asked him to produce their first LP, to be entitled Golem. Why did they want to call it Golem? Well, Golem was a mysterious Jewish figure from the 16th century who had been fashioned out of the earth. The members of Sand used ‘Golem’ as a verb to describe the transmutations which occurred when they played together. In the words of Johannes Vester:
"To experience with the unknown, to give life... that was our impulse... [those lyrics expressed] exactly what was in our mind when we Golemned." 

And so it happened that Klaus Schulze recorded five strange and extended ambient ballads by a trio of little people from Lower Saxony, who each knew precisely what sound they wished to achieve. Some of the songs hung around from their days as Part of Time, but these, now without drums or organ, were considerably extended in duration in order to consciously create "reduction, frugality, monotony, even mantric principles and elements", as Johannes Vester would later comment.
And so long as the results sounded like nothing else ever heard before they would all be quite happy. And quietly and seemingly quite easily, they achieved this goal. For Golem is a beautifully mystical and hauntingly empty record, inhabiting those same pre-industrial landscapes in which they had played as children. The songs were occasionally propelled by picked glassy acoustic guitars and pulsing monolithic bass, as though powered by the heartbeats of frost giants delicately picking their way through their ancient Saxon township in outsize and ill-fitting seven league boots. But often-as-not the music was left to hang in mid air, as hauntingly weird translated lyrics, strangely sung in some undefined post-apocalyptic space-cockney sauntered and cooed out their bee-zarre message over washes of belt-driven synthesizers and a-rhythmic agricultural ur-folk music. 

It must also be understood that this Sand LP was recorded at a time when Klaus Schulze was actually being paid by Membran Records of Berlin to experiment with the famous Kunstkopf-Stereophonie or Artificial Head Stereo Sound, in which a whole other world was placed in the headphones of those listeners who wanted to go beyond the Quadrophonic of the day. There was a plethora of recording and mixing aids being used in the early-mid 1970s, many of which followed on naturally from the 1960s Hi-Fi industry boom. But probably equal amounts were generated through the desires of sonic experimenters such as Karlheinz Stockhausen. This culminated in a situation wherein many different composers, utilising any number of variously-sized loudspeakers placed in different configurations around the audience, gradually allowed the technology itself to dominate their work rather than enhance it. Fortunately, though the Artificial Head technique did compromise the final mix of many of these LPs, the effects achieved when wearing headphones are still remarkable today. It really does do your head in. So when you listen to this Sand LP, get the cans on, babies - it’s a stone groove of ambulent proportions. Unfortunately, though Membran’s experimental record label Delta Acustic simultaneously released several other experimental ‘rock’ LPs, it is said that the Sand LP is by far the most achieving and entertaining.1

Golem begins with "Helicopter" in which the phased vocals and twittering VCS3 of Johannes Vester set up a sound worthy enough to accompany some newly-imported space religion. A few minutes into this comes the electronic pulsings of Ludwig Papenburg and the strummed bass of Uli Papenburg, rhythmic but wholly uninterested in the 4/4 beats of rock’n’roll. Their sea shanty listing ship rocks from side to side, as Johannes Vester takes up the story:

"In the sky is flying high a blackbird with a dusty cry,
On the hills the ravens croak while satyr plays a dreadful joke,
By the water damp fog whirls see the smoking steaming earth,
And the air is dark and strange and cold."

Where does this guy get his pronunciation from? Is this a regular voice in Bodenwerder? Are orators of his type ten-a-penny round his neck of the woods? Or does Johannes Vester inhabit the peripheries of every neighbourhood? Around eight or so minutes into "Helicopter", a whole other rhythm takes over and we’re suddenly pitched into a world of the recent dead. Now, Vester is some north European shaman summoning reluctant spirits out of their graves. Just as Odin pissed off the sleeping Goddesses with his acts of midnight seething, so then up pops Johannes to do the same to poor old sleeping Allfather himself. 
Next up is that crazy "Old Loggerhead" song, which kicks off with the eeriest harmonica and synthesizer-cross-the-swamp. Down comes the slow descending bass chords of Uli Papenburg, as Vester begins his next strange tale of dark forest characters at the edge of sleepy dark age townships.

"He scraped a living in a ramshackle cot
Outside the village near the mystery wood."

Of course Old Loggerhead’s behaviour is far too anti-social for the locals, themselves guilty of all kinds of clandestine habits. And Vester continues his tale of how:

"Once some fellows stalked up to his shack
They used caution - took the old beaten track
Painted a white cross on the brittle gate
So they marked the place of imaginary fate
And they returned to their peace-loving folk
Reported excited on the nocturnal joke."

Hearing Vester pronounce the phrase ‘once some fellows’ is a revelation in itself. And when he tells of Old Loggerhead’s disappearance with a ‘sinister giggle’ the effect is quite superbly chilling. And, as I said at the start of the review, you can’t get a better lyrical pay-off than:

"He was an Old Loggerhead - and actually long ago he is dead."

Side Two opens with the Alpen folk of "May Rain", a strange cross between Pearls Before Swine and Witthusser & Westrupp, with a melody directly from Can’s "Vitamin C". Mallet-balalaika and picked winter acoustics hurry along this hook-nosed song like long-coated spirit-Fagins on some unknown stroke-of-midnight mission to the gates of Hel (sic).

By the time we come to "On the Corner", Vester’s dialect has become cross-continental. He moves happily and effortlessly from a kind of Brummie-Swiss Syd Barrett to cartoon Norwegian milkmaid and her cow, via South Africa and the Amish - and sometimes all in the space of one line of lyrics. "On the Corner" is the catchy one. Y’know how certain songs sound like singles NOT because they’re commercial, but because they are just not nearly so fucking weird as the stuff that’s gone before. Well "On the Corner" is that guy. Starts with boogie drum-machine, moves through several (catchy) rhythm changes, then out of the blue settles on the single-most jarring and inappropriate cajun soul beat you ever did hear. Hear it the first time you laugh. Then you whizz back in case you misheard. Then you listen one final time for pleasure and the sheer audacity of THAT beginning. Finally you hear the entire song, and by the way it is great.
"Well, I’m standing on the corner with my feet soaking wet," sings Johannes Vester, over a soul bass line and an acoustic guitar and not much else. Maybe his voice is just a fucking genius joke because the guy sounds like a sheep-shagger. I’m not saying he is but he don’t half sound like it. Sounds like the biggest hick yokel ever allowed in the recording studio - makes "Da Da Da" by Trio sound truly worldly wise and city slick! And when we get to the line about Johannes having ‘a pain in my bones’, he really makes the overly-mannered pronunciation of Marc Bolan and Donovan sound bog standard in comparison. 

The album closes with the ten-minute two-part epic called "Sarah" - a sort of Not Available-period Residential lost-Child-Goddess-in-the-attic-of-the-world tale. Part one asks the same question over and over again: "Is it you Sarah? No, it’s the storm." The sounds are atmospheres which fall and rise like the breathing of the twilight wind on the Marlborough Downs. The music is the movement of the Sun glimpsed from some ancient eminence in that final hemi-second before it dips below the horizon. And, of course, by the middle of this song, it has become quite clear that Sarah and the storm are one. And even though Sarah the Storm Giantess has picked her way everso carefully though their neighbourhood, she has still "uncovered all the fields" and "petrified trees". And so, uncover of darkness, Sarah is "gone with the stream". Sarah is gone, Sarah is gone, Sarah is gone, Sarah is gone, Sarah is gone... fade... Sarah is gone... fade... Sarah is gone...

And so the Golem LP finishes. Sand had a truly eternal sound. Like the Mongolfier Brothers hanging above 19th century Paris, it is so close but so out-of-reach that you could imagine them all blowing away at any moment - a life-threatening experiment which seems superficially simple to achieve. And this is what you hear on W.S.Y.M. Unfortunately, it is nowadays quite impossible to buy this LP is the original format. So please beware that the modern Sand reissue suffers from that horrid modern phenomenon - Extra Tracks! O Yeah! You get no sense of the single-mindedness which Sand used for their original muse. There’s not even a nice big 30-second gap between "Sarah" and the following piece. Instead, beware that you get unnecessary demo versions of LP tracks aplenty plus a very nice unreleased solo LP by Johannes Vester.2 This lot all comes under the banner Ultrasonic Seraphim, which you have to buy to get to the real deal. That said, several of the tracks are really fucking great. It’s just a shame that it all gets mish-mashed (and even horribly cross-faded at times) in the dreaded name of Good Value. Still, it would be horribly churlish of me not to praise this reissue, because I myself wouldn’t even have had a copy otherwise. So enter the world of Sand with both feet jumping and you’ll descend into a quicksand - keep your hands free and close to the CD eject button. But dig this fucking weird Saxony sound and fill your heart. You know it makes no sense.