Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Olivia - 1978 - Corra o Risco

Olivia 
1978 
Corra o Risco



01. Fantasma Da Opera
02. Lady Jane
03. Corra O Risco
04. Jardim De Infância
05. Banda Dos Corações Solitários
06. Cavalo Marinho
07. Lobo Do Mar
08. Àgua E Vinho
09. Brilho Da Noite
10. Minha Pena Minha Dor
11. Luz E Tango


Bass – Alain Pierre
Cello, Violin, Piano, Backing Vocals – Jaquinho Morelenbaum
Drums, Percussion – Marcelo Costa
Electric Guitar, Viola, Acoustic Guitar, Percussion – Beto Rezende
Flute – David Ganc
Guitar, Backing Vocals – Nando Carneiro
Guitar, Viola, Backing Vocals – Muri Costa
Vocals – Olivia Byington

Arranged By – A Barca Do Sol


Olivia Byington is a popular Brazilian singer with several solo albums within the Brazilian Pop genre over a career, that lasted almost four decades.Born in 1958 in Rio De Janeiro, he worked as a backing singer for A Barca do Sol during her professional baby steps, the reward was the band to work as supporting musicians on her debut album ''Corra o risco'' in 1978, released on Continental.Pianist/cellist Jaques Morelenbaum and guitarist Nando Carneiro, both playing with Egberto Gismonti, were also among the participants of the album.

Olivia's debut album, apart from personal tracks, contains also a couple of A BARCA DO SOL's early tpieces, of which ''Lady Jane'' became a grand hit in Brazil around the time.As expected, the presence of the whole A BARCA DO SOL team had a huge impact on Olivia's junior discographic attempt, this might sound like a lovely Brazilian Art Pop album for the most of its length, but having this skillful band in the backgrounded resulted series of impressive arrangements with Folk, Classical and Jazz leanings.No doubt, Olivia' pristine voice was the central point on the release and why not, when having such ethereal and crystalline chords.But focusing also on the instrumental work will give the listener some extra pleasure, this album is filled with smooth interplays and elaborate instrumental work, based on cello, violin, acoustic guitars and flute, unleashing its strong ethnic roots and hidden proggy vibes.But things won't stop here.A few pieces contain also some beautiful electric guitars and a higher energy as a whole, like the dreamy ''Cavalo marinho'',  highlighted though by the farewell masterpiece ''Luz do tango'' and its fantastic TERRENO BALDIO-like atmosphere, swirling over and under complicated vocal lines, string/guitar/piano interplays and a great number of breaks.Trully a surprising prog gem.The rest of the music is dominantly acoustic, saturated with charming orchestral and jazzy flavors in an ethnic enviroment.

Overlooked gem of Brazilian Ethno Prog.Some superb instrumental lines complement Olivia Byington's awesome vocal work and any lover of Prog Folk with a variety of supporting styles should track this down.Strongly recommended.

A Barca do Sol - 1979 - Pirata

A Barca do Sol 
1979 
Pirata


01. Vô Mimbora Pru Sertão (1:05)
02. Tereza Boca Do Rio (3:35)
03. Mercado Das Flores (4:03)
04. Cavalo Marinho (2:28)
05. Jando (5:36)
06. Jardim De Infância (4:35)
07. Desencontro (3:37)
08. Estrela (2:50)
09. Manoel (4:01)
10. Rio Preto (2:45)
11. Canção Pra Ela (2:43)


- Nando Carneiro / vocals, guitars, pianos and cavaquinho
- Muri Costa / vocals, acoustic guitar, electric piano, acoustic 12 string guitar, percussion (1, 2 & 5)
- Beto Rezende / electric guitar, acoustic 6 string guitar, 12 string acoustic guitar, percussion (1 & 9)
- David Gane / C & G flutes, piccolo
- Alain Pierre / bass
- Marcelo (Gordo) / drums, percussion, berimbau

Guest musicians:
- Olívia Byington / vocals
- Children of the Instituto Nazareth / choir
- Geraldo Sanfoneiro / accordion


A hard to find album, I don´t know if it´s been released on CD. I think its the best album by A Barca, The first song is a typical brazilian folk from the countryside. The second song begins with the afro brazilian berimbau, the flute work is really nice, the lyrics are great if you can understand portuguese. the third songs are northeastern style of the baiao rhytms, with fine nylon guitar playing and the solos are with the brazilian viola, a kind of medieval 10 steel string folk guitar used in northeastern and country music. ( a nice sounding instrument by the way dont confuse it with the viola used in orchestras! ). The lyrics are poetic and abstract throughout the record. The highlight of the record is "cavalo marinho ( seahorse )" it starts with a nicely played classical nylon guitar, the singing begins, a touchy and mesmerizing simple poetry. afterwards the 10 string viola enters to make it really surreal, the solo is with the third nylon guitar, the vocal work is great. the tune ends just to the openning of the lenghty intrumental "Jando", that resembles the voyage of the " seahorse " tru the air " as the lyrics implied in the previous song ". The song starts with the Fender Rhodes piano, but is entirely dominated by many amazing flute and flautim solos by David Game, the percussion and vocals are crucial. The song is a crazy moving journey. a must hear! The rest of the Disc is less moving but good as well with a note to "manoel" wich is a typical samba you can hear in some bar in Rio´s copacabana streets, not very progressive though.., and the instrumental Rio Preto is the highlight on the B side of this record, good playing overall. I love it !

A Barca do Sol - 1976 - Durante o Verão

A Barca do Sol 
1976
Durante o Verão




01. Durante O Ver?o (2:49)
02. Hotel Colonial (3:39)
03. A L?ngua E A Bainha (2:50)
04. Os Pilares Da Cultura (2:42)
05. Karen (2:20)
06. Memorial Day (4:15)
07. Banquete (3:46)
08. Belladonna, Lady Of The Rocks ( 6:03)
09. Outros Carnavais (2:20)

- Nando Carneiro / vocals and acoustic guitars
- Muri Costa / acoustic 6 & 12 string guitars and vocals
- Jacques Morelebaum / cello, violin and vocals
- Marcos Stul / bass
- Marcelo (Gordo) Costa / percussion, drums
- Beto Resende / electric guitar, 6 & 12 string acoustic guitars, percussion,
- Marcelo Bernardes / flute



 I knew this album existed since the beginning of the recorded times but I had never the opportunity to listen to it until a couple of years ago. 30 years of good moments lost in the dust of time! Well, for my comfort, it's good to know that I'm still ready to hear it as long as I wish from now on. Great! A BARCA DO SOL "Durante O Verão" is a really a great album and worth the price and the hearing. However, it's tough to transcribe into words of a different language so many references easy to be picked up by a Brazilian or for some foreigner that lived here time enough to understand clearly all hidden subjects, all cryptic issues, all delicious puzzles. I'll try to do my best, maybe it'll work.
Here A BARCA DO SOL dived deeply into the folk spectrum, this time adding general Latin American spices to the notorious Brazilian substrate - a dangerous feature since this mixing may border confusion but in the end the band knew how to manage it. Noticeable are the flow of odd instruments, sound effects and lengthy singing parts (in Portuguese) but vocals are soft and acceptable even if one doesn't catch the language and the weird tunes are mainly incidental not spoiling the overall good atmosphere. Anyway, Morelenbaum's cello dominates the scene almost all the time.

From the different tracks presented, the mini-epic 'Hotel Colonial' deserves a special look not only for being the best album track but for the story it keeps; the song does reference to two other classical Brazilian popular songs: 'Luar do sertão' and 'Chão de estrelas', both clearly impregnated in the soul of each citizen hereunder the Equator (well, at least for those that were born before 1970). The intro is sampled from the first of the mentioned songs while lyrics run referring to the second. Subtly observed are some touches of classical composer Heitor Villa-Lobos in the background. Middle section brings weird and interesting drumming action challenged by exalted violin backing, all finishing with an uplifting flute solo accompanied by a massive instrumental work. Quaint and beautiful at the same time.

'Durante o verão', the opening track is warm and gentle: fine lyrics, fair arrangement and fancy vocals. 'A língua e a bainha' is poignant and dreamy, provided with majestic fingered guitars and somber ambience. 'Os pilares da cultura' completes the album's first half with a neat hard melody and frantic vocals - A BARCA DO SOL rock face is displayed con gusto here. 'Karen' is short and serene, a fair intermezzo.

'Memorial Day' initiates the album's second half with a blatant space rock air, reminiscent of Pink Floyd while the rest is a collage of the band's own sounds, nicely disposed. 'Banquete' is clean and exquisite showing band's romantic side and again full of references now related to Beatles and singer Milton Nascimento. The 'Eleanor Rigby' samples are decorated with classical and folk delightful aromas. 'Belladona, Lady of the rocks' the longest song here, is sung in Portuguese in spite the English title and it's the track where the A BARCA DO SOL present their most experimental portion. 'Outros carnavais' ends the album like a flurry of a furious and fierce folk festival - funny and fantastic.

What to say? Another hidden gem lost in a shelf of distant and pleasant times - so difficult to get, so hard to find. But do not hesitate, seeing "Durante O Verão" go and grab it since it's an excellent addition to any music collection.

A Barca do Sol - 1974 - A Barca do Sol

A Barca do Sol 
1974 
A Barca do Sol




01. A Primeira Batalha 3:05
02. Brilho Da Noite 4:03
03. Arremesso 3:43
04. As Boas Consciências 3:07
05. Caminhão 4:33
06. Lady Jane 2:20
07. Dragão Da Bondade 3:00
08. Alaska 3:30
09. O Fantasma Da Ópera 2:44
10. Corsário Satã 4:12
11. A Barca Do Sol 3:16

- Nando Carneiro / vocals and acoustic guitars
- Muri Costa / acoustic 6 & 12 string guitars and vocals
- Jacques Morelebaum / cello, violin and vocals
- Marcos Stul / bass
- Marcelo (Gordo) Costa / percussion
- Beto Resende / percussion, 6 & 12 string acoustic guitars and electric guitar
- Marcelo Bernardes / flute

Synthesizer – Egberto Gismonti (tracks: A3, B3)

Producer – Egberto Gismonti



Now is the moment where I have to silence my heart to be able to hear my mind. but it's tough! Listening to A BARCA DO SOL, and more specifically their homonymous 1974 debut is like doing a regression to some of the most beautiful days of my youth years; also some hard moments when my beloved country was ruled by a dictatorship may be displayed there. I had to hear and re- hear again and again "A Barca Do Sol" and I have to confess that goose bumps and wet eyes appeared frequently. Anyway, life goes on.
What band were they? To be short: simply a fine group of some of the most talented musicians who played in Brazil in the 1970s. Jacques Morelenbaum, leader, cello player and main vocalist, is nowadays one of the most celebrated Brazilian maestros; Ritchie, an English-born artist, soon engaged with legendary band Vimana (hard-progressive stuff with only a single issued) and later trailed a new-wave singer career; the other fellows, like Nando Carneiro, Beto Resende and Alan Pierre, are all of them Premier League people; last but not the least, the producer and inspirational personality, Egberto Gismonti, a giant that needs no introduction. Another curiosity: they started playing as a backing band for a bossa-nova singer - very weird!

What kind of music did they play? Folk or folk-progressive, doubtless. Although they were basically city guys it's clear that they researched a lot to grab all possible sounds emanating from Brazil's heart of the country. Lyrics are great, very introspective and a bit sour, but generally with fine poetry; on-line translation cannot help here, unfortunately and even experienced translators may have some problems with so many references that are hard to display in a different language. There's a torrent of singing parts which may frighten foreign ears but the musical solutions are awesome: cello, viola, flutes and guitars work splendidly.

All songs keep a certain resemblance among them providing the album with a conceptual soul, not totally right unless you could focus the action in its related time - tough if you don't live the place and time. 'A primeira batalha', the opening track is an exquisite and amusing song, with a noticeable South American aroma which is pretty and pleasant. 'Arremesso', probably the best album's track, is full of reminiscences with its poignant and sorrowful vocals and accompaniment; this particular song is when my heart beats franticly for so many remembrances of lived times.

'Lady Jane' shares the title with the Stones' song but it's really another one and a good one too - the Brazilian way is so typical and remarkable that the tunes become clearly catchy. 'A Barca do Sol', the title-track and ending song is unique and where the band show their skilful and capacity. Other album tracks are, trust me, from average to good.

This album presents some of the best progressive moments produced in Brazil during the 1970s and even not being a masterpiece, it's very recommendable to be added to any music collection.

The Lloyd McNeill Quartet - 1970 - Washington Suite

The Lloyd McNeill Quartet
1970
Washington Suite



01. Home Rule 6:20
02. Just 71% Moor 8:50
03. 2504 Cliffbourne Pl. 6:15
04. Fountain In The Circle
05. City Tryptic 20:50
Sandra Is The City
The Black Mayor
Imani (Faith)
06. Fountain In The Circle

Bass – Marshal Hawkins
Bassoon – Keneth Pasmanick
Clarinet – William Huntington
Drums – Eric Gravatt
Electric Piano – Eugene Rush
Flute, Composed By – Lloyd McNeill
French Horn – Orrin Olson
Oboe – Andrew White

Music composed for the Capital Ballet Company, Wash., DC.
Recorded March 22, 1970 at the National Collection of Fine Arts and March 31, at Workshop-Corcoran.



New edition of this very rare deep spiritual jazz album (currently £400 on Discogs for an original!) first released as a private-press album in 1970 on flautist Lloyd McNeill’s own Asha Record label in Washington, DC. First reissued on Soul Jazz Records’ Universal Sound sub-label in 2011 (long deleted) and now available newly digitally remastered on Soul Jazz Records main label.
Lloyd McNeill is an African-American flautist, poet, painter, and photographer born in Washington, D.C., in 1935. His multi-disciplinary creative life led to encounters and friendships with Nina Simone, Picasso, Eric Dolphy, Nana Vasconceles and other legendary cultural figures. Lloyd McNeill’s hypnotic Washington Suite was originally commissioned as a piece of music for the Capital Ballet Company, in Washington, DC.
McNeill grew up through the era of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and his life and work is a reflection of those ideals. In the mid-1960s he moved to France where he became friends with Picasso, working with a number of émigré-jazz musicians whilst living in Paris.
In the late 1960s he taught jazz and painting workshops at the New Thing Art and Architecture Center in Washington. In the 1970s he travelled throughout Brazil and West Africa studying music and taught music anthropology in the US.

The Lloyd McNeill Quartet - 1969 - Asha

The Lloyd McNeill Quartet 
1969 
Asha



01. Asha 8:45
02. As A Matter Of Fact 4:53
03. Two-Third's Pleasure 5:53
04. Dig Where Dat's At! 3:27
05. St. Margaret's Church 6:50
06. Effervescence 6:51
07. Warmth Of A Sunny Day 10:22

Bass – Steve Novosel
Percussion – Eric Gravatt
Percussion [Latin] – Paul Hawkins
Piano – Gene Rush
Piccolo Flute, Flute, Composed By – Lloyd McNeill


Lloyd McNeill is a jazz composer, flutist, poet, photographer, teacher, and globally celebrated visual artist. He is regarded by many other musicians as an innovator on the flute. He self-released three legendary recordings between 1969 and 1973. In addition, he has worked with everyone from Nina Simone and Nana Vasconcelos to Ron Carter and Cecil McBee.

McNeill studied music at Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C. before joining the U.S Navy, where he served as a hospital corpsman. Upon discharge he attended Morehouse College in Atlanta where he majored in art. He also played music there -- conga drum notably, though he was already a proficient flutist, working with the Lloyd Terry Band, Simone, and Lionel Hampton. He graduated from Morehouse in 1961, and his senior exhibit drew the attention of James A. Porter, chairman of the art department at Howard University. Porter offered him a full tuition scholarship and McNeill became the school's first MFA student. While at Howard, McNeill studied everything from fresco painting and line drawing to easel painting. In addition to visual art, he undertook advanced flute studies with Eric Dolphy in 1963 during a year at Dartmouth as artist in residence. He moved to Paris in 1964 with saxophonist Andrew White, a Howard classmate and close friend.

While in Paris, McNeill played flute in a variety of settings, and studied at Paris' L'École Nationale Des Beaux Arts. While living there he met Pablo Picasso and his wife Caroline. The remained friends until Picasso's and Caroline's deaths. He also found time to play music, though mostly in Cannes, collaborating with Guatemalan guitarist and singer/songwriter Julio Arenas Menas.

McNeill returned to the U.S., where he accepted the position of artist in residence at Spelman College from 1965-1966.

In 1969, he taught part-time at Howard and began playing with jazz groups around town. That year, Asha, billed to the Lloyd McNeill Quartet, appeared from his Asha Records label. It was followed by the duo offering Tanner Suite with bassist Marshall Hawkins.

In 1970, McNeill began a three-plus-decade teaching association with Rutgers University, and moved to New York City. He not only taught art, but Afro-American History, and was instrumental in the development of the school's jazz studies program. He did advanced flute studies with Harold Jones and issued his second quartet offering, Washington Suite, the same year. It featured White as an added guest.
McNeill didn't record again until 1976. In the interim, he traveled to West Africa on a State Department grant and visited and studied in Senegal, Benin (then Dahomey), the Ivory Coast, Ghana, and Nigeria, where he met Fela Kuti, stayed at his home, and played at his club in Lagos. While in Africa, McNeill gave lectures, painted, drew, and exhibited his art.

In 1976, McNeill formed another label, Baobab Sounds, on which he issued Treasures. His band included McBee, Ray Armando, Dom Salvador, Brian Brake, and Porthino. Busy teaching and working as an integral part of the African-American art and music communities, McNeill didn't record again until 1978, when he released Tori on Baobab. While Armando was once again part of the group, the rest of the band included guitarist John La Barbera, bassist Buster Williams, drummer Victor Lewis, percussionists Dom Um Romão and Vasconcelos, and Howard Johnson on tuba.

The final recording from Baobab, and McNeill's last recording for 18 years, was 1980's Elegia, which featured McBee, Porthino, Salvador, White, guitarist Claudio Celso, and vocalist Susan Osborn.

X-Tem-Por-E From 1980 to 1998, McNeill taught, painted, wrote, published poetry and essays, and exhibited nationally. When he returned to recording, he cut the duet album Ex.Tem.Por.E with pianist Richard Kimball on New Milford Records. McNeill retired from Rutgers in 2003 but remained Professor Emeritus. In 2007, he was chosen by the United States Postal Service to design a postage stamp for the celebration of Kwanza. It was circulated in 2009.
In 2010 Soul Jazz, through its Universal Sound imprint, re-released Asha, and followed it in 2011 with a new version of Washington Suite.


New edition of this very rare deep spiritual jazz album, the debut release from flautist Lloyd McNeill released on his private-press Asha Record label and recorded in Washington, DC in 1969 (originally only 500 copies were ever made). First reissued on Soul Jazz Records’ Universal Sound sub-label in 2011 and now available newly digitally remastered on Soul Jazz Records main label.
McNeill studied music at Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C. before joining the U.S Navy, where he served as a hospital corpsman. Upon discharge he attended Morehouse College in Atlanta where he majored in art. He graduated from Morehouse in 1961, and his senior exhibit drew the attention of James A. Porter, chairman of the art department at Howard University. Porter offered him a full tuition scholarship and McNeill became the school’s first MFA student.
In 1969, he taught part-time at Howard and began playing with jazz groups around town. That year, Asha, billed to the Lloyd McNeill Quartet, appeared from his Asha Records label.
His music mixes jazz with Latin, Brazilian and African rhythms that McNeill learnt was studying anthropology in his travels through much of Africa and Brazil (where he joined with Dom Salvador, Paulinho da Viola, Paulo Maura and Martinho da Vila).
Lloyd McNeill features on two earlier Soul Jazz releases, ‘New Thing’ and ‘Freedom, Rhythm and Sound”. Soul Jazz Records have also recently reissued Lloyd McNeill’s stunning Washington Suite album recorded in 1970.

Zbigniew Seifert - 1979 - We'll Remember Zbiggy

Zbigniew Seifert 
1979 
We'll Remember Zbiggy




01. Spring On The Farm 8:03
02. Rubato 7:54
03. Chromatic Blues 3:23
04. Laverne 5:40
05. Love In The Garden 5:04
06. Air Power 3:37
07. Zal 7:26
08. McCoy's Nightmare 10:33

A1 recorded in Stuttgart/W.-Germany, March 1976
A2 recorded live at Donaueschingen Music Festival, October 1976
A3 recorded in New York City, December 1978
A4 recorded live at Jazzclub Ostertor, Bremen, April 1976
B1 recorded at NDR Jazzworkshop, Hamburg, March 1977
B2 recorded live in Brussels, December 1977
B3 recorded in New York City, December 1976
B4 recorded at NDR, Hamburg, March 1974

Albert Mangelsdorff (tb)
Charlie Mariano, Leszek Zadlo, Hans Koller (sax)
Zbigniew Seifert (vln),
Wolfgang Dauner, Joachim Kuhn, Joe Haider, Richie Beirach (p)
avid Darling (cello)
Philip Catherine (g)
Adelhard Roidinger, Glen Moore, Hans Coller (b)



Various settings for Seifert's remarkable violin on this 1979 platter, including a solo, some duos and full ensemble jaunts.  It hits the 4-star level a few times, particularly the unique "Rubato" that sets a sublime violin workout against a trombone drone of sorts, and the closer "McCoy's Nightmare", the only real Fusion burner in the program, with its active rhythms and driving horn riffs recalling mid-70s Billy Cobham and a truly astounding saxophone solo.  The opening track is also a full band workout, but fails to go beyond mediocrity with its formulaic solos and indifferent rhythm section. "Chromatic Blues" is another gem to be found here, with a really odd bass line and generally very odd rhythmic interplay.  Overall the music does tend towards the disposable, ordinary pleasantries of the non-avant-garde 70s "jazz" world, notably the weakest cut "Laverne". As a violinist, Seifert is certainly at least as good as Jean-Luc Ponty, but the full ensemble compositions and playing in general doesn't get anywhere near the mind-blowing heights of Ponty's albums as a leader around the same time in the mid to late 70s.

Zbigniew Seifert - 1979 - Passion

Zbigniew Seifert 
1979 
Passion




01. Passion 5:06
02. Where Are You From 5:20
03. Sunrise Music 9:49
04. Kilimanjaro
05. Pinocchio 6:24
06. Singing Dunes 4:11
07. Quo Vadis 6:02
08. Escape From The Sun 3:40

Bass – Eddie Gomez
Drums – Jack DeJohnette
Guitar – John Scofield
Percussion – Naná Vasconcelos
Piano – Richie Beirach
Violin – Zbigniew Seifert



Born in Krakow, Poland, this highly talented jazz violinist died of cancer at just 33. The two albums I’ve heard are evidence of a voice unlike the other jazz violinists from mid-century. If you’ve heard the early Jean-Luc Ponty, there is a similar approach to a kind of untamed, vibrato-less, full-bow attack. But in Zbiggy’s case, a European sensibility throws his improvisations into a heightened lyricism; one might even say a search for beauty. In fact, “searching” describes him aptly. Be prepared to expend emotion if you listen.

Passion’s “back-up” band is a who’s who of 1978: Jack DeJohnette, John Scofield, Eddy Gomez, Ritchie Beirach, and Nana, the storied percussionist. It is apparent from the interplay that all the players are excited and engaged.

I think of Zbigniew Siefert as unsung, but I’m happy to see now there is a documentary film about him.  It looks like his memory is being kept alive, with a passion.
Peter Stenshoel


Zbigniew Seifert - 1979 - Kilimanjaro

Zbigniew Seifert 
1979 
Kilimanjaro





101. Coral (Zbigniew Seifert)
102. Impressions (John Coltrane)
103. Kilimanjaro (Zbigniew Seifert)

201. Bez Tytulu (Zbigniew Seifert)
202. Where Are You From (Zbigniew Seifert)
203. On The Farm [+ interview] (Zbigniew Seifert)

Recorded live in club "Pod Jaszczurami", Cracaw, Poland, November 14, 1978

Zbigniew Seifert - violin,
Jaroslaw Smietana - guitar,
Janusz Grzywacz - electric piano,
Zbigniew Wegehaupt - bass,
Mieczyslaw Gorka - drums.

Recorded live in club "Pod Jaszczurami", Cracaw, Poland, November (misspelled on back cover as Nowember) 14, 1978
This release includes both volumes of the 'Kilimanjaro' LPs released in 1978.





Polish violin virtuoso Zbigniew Seifert passed on the firmament of the Polish Jazz scene like a bright comet before dying from cancer in 1979 at the ridiculous age of 32. Today, decades later, he is considered as one of the greatest Jazz talents that ever lived and every piece of music recorded by him during his short career achieved a legendary status. Strongly influenced by the music and musical philosophy of John Coltrane, Seifert is often called "the Coltrane of violin", mainly because of his exceptional improvisational power, brilliant technique and a totally integrated approach to Jazz, pushing the boundaries with every note uttered from his instrument. Seifert's compositions, although rooted in European music, provide him with a perfect vehicle for his ambitious explorations and are all timeless masterpieces. This album (and its companion Vol.2) presents a live recording at his home town (Krakow) famous Jazz club "Pod Jaszczurami", made less than a year before his tragic death with a great group consisting of the best players on the local scene: guitarist Jaroslaw Smietana, keyboardist Janusz Grzywacz, bassist Zbigniew Wegehaupt and drummer Mieczyslaw Gorka. The music includes two original compositions by Seifert, including the extended piece which gave the album its title. The third piece is a tribute to Seifert's mentor John Coltrane in the form of Coltrane's famous composition "Impressions". This is exceptional music, which should be revered by every Jazz enthusiast on this planet with no exception. Absolutely essential!

Zbigniew Seifert - 1978 - Solo Violin

Zbigniew Seifert
1978
Solo Violin





01. Confessions 11:15
02. Kind Of Time 16:10
03. Birds 5:27
04. Evening Psalm 12:57

"This record is dedicated to my wife Agnieszka."

In tracks A2 and B2 Zbigniew Seifert adds a voice to prerecorded part.
Recorded May 1976 at 'Forum Junge Musik', live in Bremen.


Apart from Leroy Jenkins' Solo Concert from 1976, I do not think that there are many solo violin albums that fall within the broad "jazz" genre. You could also argue that Polly Bradfield's "Solo Violin Improvisations" from 1979 is jazz. Now Polonia re-issued this album by Polish musician Zbigniew Seifert. Seifert was a classically trained violinist whose musical world opened when listening to Coltrane. He switched to sax shortly, then moved back to violin, trying to capture Coltrane's timeless expressivity and open esthetic. On this album, you can hear this Coltrane influence, together with a modern classical touches and even some European folk. His improvisations range from the very abstract to real rhythmic jazzy, from sad to joyful. On two tracks, he dubbed some additional violin, as a kind of background support, or even drone. Seifert died in 1979 at the age of 32 and he did not leave that many records. If you search for this record on internet, download links can be found all over the place.

Zbigniew Seifert - 1977 - Zbigniew Seifert

Zbigniew Seifert 
1977 
Zbigniew Seifert




01. On The Farm 5:26
02. Quasimodo 4:21
03. Way To Oasis 3:55
04. For The Love Of You 3:58
05. Chinatown 5:11
06. Nasty Gal 3:58
07. Would You Ever... 4:09
08. Song For Christopher 5:41

Zbigniew Seifert - violin, synthesizer, grand piano, organ
James Batton - electric piano, clavinet (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8)
Rob Franken - synthesizer (1, 2, 3, 5, 6)
Hubert Eaves - grand piano, organ, clavinet (2, 4, 5)
Dwight Brewster - clavinet, electric piano (2, 7)
Mike Mandel - synthesizer (5)
Reggie Lucas - electric guitar (2, 3, 4)
Stefan Diez - electric guitar (1, 2, 3, 5, 6)
Joe Caro - electric guitar, acoustic guitar (1, 4, 6)
Philip Catherine - electric guitar (6)
John Turner - electric bass (1, 2, 5, 8)
John Lee - electric bass (3, 4, 6, 7)
Hakim Emanuel Thompson - drums, triangle (1, 5, 8)
Gerry Brown - drums (2, 3, 6)
Daryl Brown - drums (4, 7)
Mtume - percussion (1, 2, 5, 6, 7)
Jon Faddis - trumpet (2, 7)
Michael Lawrence - trumpet (2, 7)
Randy Brecker - trumpet (6)
Michael Brecker - tenor saxophone (2, 6, 7)
Dave Taylor - bass trombone (2, 7)
Chris Hinze - flutes (3, 4, 8)
Cheryl Alexander - vocal (4, 7, 8)
Tawatha Agee - vocal (4, 7)



A masterful improviser who could have ranked at the top with Adam Makowicz and Michal Urbaniak, Zbigniew Seifert's early death robbed Poland of one of its top jazz artists. Seifert started on the violin when he was six, and ten years later started doubling on alto sax. He studied violin at the University of Krakow, but when he started leading his own band in 1964, he mostly played alto, showing off the influence of John Coltrane. When he was a member of Tomasz Stanko's very advanced quintet (1969-1973), Seifert switched back to violin and largely gave up playing sax. He moved to Germany in 1973, was with Hans Koller's Free Sound from 1974-1975, and freelanced (including with Joachim Kuhn). Seifert played at the Monterey Jazz Festival with John Lewis in 1976, and the following year recorded with Oregon. As a leader, Seifert (who was affectionately known as "Zbiggy") performed music that ranged from free jazz to fusion. Seifert recorded for Muza in 1969, Mood from 1974-1976, MPS in 1976, and Capitol from 1977-1978. He died of cancer at the age of 32.

Tomasz Stanko, Michal Urbaniak, Zbigniew Seifert - 1972 - We'll Remember Komeda

Tomasz Stanko, Michal Urbaniak, Zbigniew Seifert 
1972 
We'll Remember Komeda 



01. Choral and Repetition
02. No Love Song at All
03. Crazy Girl (from Knife in the Water)
04. Meine Süße Europäische Heimat (Oh My Sweet European Home)
a) Canzone for Warschau
b) Witches
c) The Trumpet Player is Innocent
d) Dirge for Europe
05. Kattorna
06. Rosemary's Baby

Zbigniew Seifert - violin, alto sax
Tomasz Stanko - piano, trumpet
Michal Urbaniak - violin, tenor sax, electric violin, soprano sax
Urszula Dudziak - vocal, miscellaneous percussion
Roman Dylag - bass
Attila Zoller - guitar
Peter Giger - drums
Armen Halburian - percussion

Recorded at Walldorf Tonstudio, Frankfurt am Main, Germany on June 22-23, 1972

   
1972 saw the release of this brilliant and moving tribute by the musicians who played with and were influenced by the late Polish composer and pianist Krzysztof Komeda. That these musicians make up the elite of the Poland's jazz scene is plenty notable and a tribute to Komeda's vision and influence. They are trumpeter Tomasz Stanko, violinist and saxophonist Michal Urbaniak and Zbigniew Seifert, bassist Roman Dylag, drummer Peter Giger, vocalist Urszula Dudziak, guitarist Attila Zoller, and percussionist Armen Halburian. The program consists of six of Komeda's compositions arranged by various members of the group, musically directed here by Stanko. Among the most notable tracks are the opener, "Choral and Repetition," the "Crazy Girl" theme from Komeda's score for Roman Polanski's Knife in Water, and the theme from Rosemary's Baby. The opener is where we get the picture of Komeda's influence on three successive generations of jazzmen from Eastern Europe. In Stanko's arrangement, the languid, processional intro is stretched to its limit. Instead of the nearly modal hard bop improvisational section that followed the theme and a quicker tempo, Stanko offers a near-free jazz reading at a breakneck pace. It's breathtaking and a little intimidating, but sublime nonetheless. Also, Zoller's gorgeous "No Lovesong at All," played with his own quartet, is a strikingly beautiful and mysterious pastoral read of the original. Where Komeda allowed the melody to suggest harmonic variations that follow it, Zoller inverts the process and the melody flows from the harmonic convergence of his guitar's interplay with the bass and cymbals; remarkable and haunting. In sum, this is a welcome addition to the Komeda library and his legacy that remains, decades after his death,

Robert Wood - 1976 - Vibrarock

Robert Wood
1976 
Vibrarock




01. Rue St-Martin 1:10
02. Hammer 6:05
03. Port Meadow 4:05
04. Woodlands Walk 2:30
05. This Is The Meaning Of 6:50
06. Submariner 2:45
07. Wagram Jam 4:15
08. Star 3:45
09. Hammer '74 6:05
10. Tombac / Edwige Medley 3:30

Bass – Beliaev (tracks: B1), Mike Howlett (tracks: B2),
Olivier Zdrzalik (tracks: A1 to A5, B4, B5), Patrick Fontaine (2) (tracks: B3)
Drums – Bruno Caroube (tracks: B1), Marcel Bel (tracks: A1 to A5),
Olivier Didier (tracks: B3 to B5), Pierre Moerlen (tracks: B2)
Effects [Space Echoes] – Venux Deluxe (tracks: B5)
Flute – Didier Malherbe (tracks: B5)
Vibraphone – Robert Wood
Vocals – Robert Wood (tracks: A1 to A5, B1, B3, B5)


A1 - A5 Recorded live at Celle St-Cloud Festival June 1975
B1 Recorded at Condorcet Studio, Toulouse, April 1975
B2 Recorded Late Afternoon Salle Wagram, Paris, December 1975
B3 Recorded at The Aquarium Studio, Paris, May 1974
B4 Recorded "Live" at The Salle Wagram, Paris, December 1974
B5 Recorded "Live" at The Hall Comminges, Toulouse, November 1974


Pierre Moerlen, Mike Howlett, Didier Malherbe, Olivier Didier, Patrick Fontaine, Olivier Zdralik, Marcel Bel, Bruno Caroube, all great musicians involved in good progressive music at the time with Robert Wood on an unique instrument, the electric vibes. Sound varies on the tracks but the engineering by Francis Linon (Gong, Magma) catches the excitement and rawness of live performance. Cult.

Robert Wood - 1976 - Tombac Vibe

Robert Wood
1976
Tombac Vibe



01. Music's For Me (Townhall) 1:22
02. Food For Love 2:55
03. Funny Fair 4:15
04. Tombac 7:00
05. Help Me To Love You 4:10
06. Madman's Lament 3:20
07. Vibrana 1:20
08. Shades Of Mu 6:25
09. Saltimbanque 2:45

Bass – Perry Yeldham
Drums – Patrice Cramer
Vibraphone [Acoustic, Electric], Vocals – Robert Wood

Recorded and mixed at Acorn Studios, Stonesfield, England, July, August 1976.




In 1971-72, English vibraphonist Robert Wood was a member of French band Lard Free, the band Gilbert Artman led before Urban Sax. Wood later asked Artman to play drums on his own second LP, ‘Sonanbular’, while Artman included vibraphone on the first Lard Free official LP (1973), as well as the Clear Light Symphony LP (1975) and Urban Sax. The ‘Sonanbular’ front cover (the industrial devices pictured above) was used for Dominique Grimaud’s epochial book on French 1970s avant-rock ‘Un Certain Rock Français’ volume 1 (1977). Half of the tracks on ‘Sonabular’ are vibes+drums duos where the drums are recorded from a distance, as if from next room (tr.# 1, 4 & 5). But their dialogue is perfectly matched as the drummer adjusts to the vibe player’s bravado. On #4 especially, Wood sounds like a Cecil Taylor on vibraphones. Other tracks, especially the longest ones, arise from mutli-tracked vibraphones (tr.# 3) allowing Wood to build nuanced soundscapes from mostly soft, tiny sounds from 3 different instruments. His techniques includes stereo panning, perspective soundboard mixing and extended vibraphone technique. Woods is not afraid of ugly sounds, sometimes hitting the wooden frame or creating nasty metallic sounds with his mallets. In trying to extend the vibraphone sonic possibilities he sometimes favors the non-resonant sounds of the instrument. Unlike any other vibes player I’ve heard, Wood’s vibraphone playing is unique and owes nothing to Lionel Hampton or the Modern Jazz Quartet…….
Unlike earlier jazz experiments, on his third plate British vibrophonist Robert Wood changed the instrumental nature of his work to vocal. This disc, to a great surprise, is oversaturated with his vocals (very good, by the way), whose timbre remotely resembles Jim Morrison with some notes. Music more and more resembles a bizarre form of the sympho prog, filled with an acoustic and electric vibraphone that slightly resembles an electric piano by sound, and an active rhythm section from bass and drums. Jazz trends also have a place to be here. Extremely interesting and original album……

Robert Wood - 1973 - Sonabular

Robert Wood
1973 
Sonabular




01. Inspiration 3:30
02. Edwige 5:20
03. Words For A Tunisian Song 10:00
04. Woodlands 8:10
05. Shades Of Mu 12:00

Drums – Gilbert Artman
Vibraphone, Composed By – Robert Wood


In 1971-72, English vibraphonist Robert Wood was a member of French band Lard Free, the band Gilbert Artman led before Urban Sax. Wood later asked Artman to play drums on his own second LP, ‘Sonanbular’, while Artman included vibraphone on the first Lard Free official LP (1973), as well as the Clear Light Symphony LP (1975) and Urban Sax. The ‘Sonanbular’ front cover (the industrial devices pictured above) was used for Dominique Grimaud’s epochial book on French 1970s avant-rock ‘Un Certain Rock Français’ volume 1 (1977). Half of the tracks on ‘Sonabular’ are vibes+drums duos where the drums are recorded from a distance, as if from next room (tr.# 1, 4 & 5). But their dialogue is perfectly matched as the drummer adjusts to the vibe player’s bravado. On #4 especially, Wood sounds like a Cecil Taylor on vibraphones. Other tracks, especially the longest ones, arise from mutli-tracked vibraphones (tr.# 3) allowing Wood to build nuanced soundscapes from mostly soft, tiny sounds from 3 different instruments. His techniques includes stereo panning, perspective soundboard mixing and extended vibraphone technique. Woods is not afraid of ugly sounds, sometimes hitting the wooden frame or creating nasty metallic sounds with his mallets. In trying to extend the vibraphone sonic possibilities he sometimes favors the non-resonant sounds of the instrument. Unlike any other vibes player I’ve heard, Wood’s vibraphone playing is unique and owes nothing to Lionel Hampton or the Modern Jazz Quartet.

Robert Wood - 1971 - Tarot

Robert Wood
1971
Tarot



01 The Sun, Rain And Good Weather 9:40
02 The Hanged Man, To Lose The Day 8:30
03 The High Priestess, Vibrana 26:00


Alto Saxophone, Flute – Steve Potts
Bass – Kent Carter
Drums – Ron Pittner
Vibraphone – Robert Wood

Recorded in Paris, June 24 1971.



English vibraphone player, singer and producer. Eclectic style from jazz to psychedelic rock and post-progressive. Known for playing Premier vibraphones, and a customised Deagan ElectraVibe through a variety of effect pedals. His singular vocal style reminiscent of Morrison but also Kevin Ayers. Generally associated with Gong, Canterbury and Hawkwind. Played in the groups Vibrarock, Lard Free and Celestrial Communication Orchestra.


One of the rarest session by ROBERT WOOD , first on collectible label EDICI , secondly with great jazzmen as STEVE POTTS soprano KENT CARTER cello bass RON PITTNER drums , the session is not sounding as most of the ROBERT WOOD record ( i mean mostly fuzz jazz funk or acid jazz ) , here the session is more sounding VANT GARD / SPIRIT JAZZ due ot the grreat backing musicians