Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Pink Floyd - 1975 - All Roads Lead To Knebworth

Pink Floyd
July 5, 1975
Knebworth Festival
Stevenage
Hertfordshire, U.K.

All Roads Lead To Knebworth - Eat A Peach 

101. Introduction
102. Raving And Drooling
103. Tune Up
104. Gotta Be Crazy
105. Tune Ups/
106. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 1-5)
107. Have A Cigar (Vocals By Roy Harper)
108. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 6-9)

201. Speak To Me
202. Breathe
203. On The Run
204. Time
205. Breathe (Reprise)
206. The Great Gig In The Sky
207. Money
208. Us And Them
209. Any Colour You Like
210. Brain Damage
211. Eclipse

301. Tune Ups
302. Echoes
303. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (parts 1 - 9) (Alternate Take)
304. Welcome To The Machine (Alternate Take
305. Have A Cigar (Alternate Tak


Pink Floyd’s first appearance at the Knebworth Festival is well known amongst fans, what was supposed to be a massive homecoming for the band turned into one of their most famous disasters. Their road crew, tired and jet lagged from the recent American tour that literally ended just days prior had a monumental task of assembling the band’s massive gear, and to make matters worse the power supply was deemed “inadequate”. Typical with many a rock gathering, the fences were torn down and the original crowd of 40,000 swelled to over 100,000, yet perhaps the most serious issue was within the band themselves. Already somewhat unfocused in their newer music they had been honing over the past year, the recent American tour and more specifically the riots that surrounded their Los Angeles dates had given the band a cold view of their current state, one that would resonate on their next three records. Needless to say the band turned in an average performance, wrought with technical difficulties and the blood thirsty press used the opportunity to slam the band with sub par reviews, the band would get a measure of revenge for just a few months later the Wish You Were Here record would be released and go to the top of the charts.

The recordings that have surface from the concert are all culled from the audience, and early bootlegs did little for ones assessment of the gig, the early title Wish Roy Were In Knebworth (Highland HL-309/310/311) used a higher generation tape that made for a difficult listen. Some appreciation was finally able to be garnered with the release of Knebworth Park (Sigma 20) in 2008. With much improved sound and a close to complete version focusing on Recorder 1, it was more than listenable, in fact it was the title that really broke the ice for me as far as getting to know this performance. The label used the best source tapes they could find and the mastering was up to the Sigma labels usual high standards, Plomerus reviewed the title for this site, for anyone who has not done so, follow the link for a passionate and detailed review. Then in 2012, Sigma released Knebworth 1975 New Master (Sigma 074) featuring a newly discovered tape of the second half of the concert with excellent sound quality. For this new title from the Eat A Peach folks, we finally get the complete performance using an amalgamation of the three audience sources coupled with excellent packaging making for an incredible presentation of this material.

When compared to the Knebworth Park (Sigma 20) title, this new Eat A Peach title is a little lower in volume but the label did not use as much noise reduction making for a much warmer sound but this also lends itself to having just a slight more tape hiss. No worries, once the music starts it is not really noticeable. Eat A Peach also uses a fraction of Recorder 2 to patch the cut at the tail end of Have A Cigar 5:01 to the beginning :24 seconds of Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts 6-9), something that was a glaring omission of the Sigma title, we now get the complete first set. Marred with equipment problems, the band pushes on and after a couple listening’s of this performance, in my opinion it is unjustly criticized. While not a stellar performance it certainly is not horrible. The guitar and drums being low in the mix for Raving And Drooling lends to its disjointed sound, around 7:20 Roger lets off a Eugene-esque scream that is incredible. The guitar and the drums by now are better in the mix for You Gotta Be Crazy making for a better version of the song. The tune ups between songs are long and tedious, so hampered by Richard’s Hammond organ that Roger explains to the crowd the both David and he both tune to the organ, since it is out of tune it throws everything off. When they finally start Shine On it has a cold metallic sound yet somehow the coldness lends itself to the feeling of isolation that is portrayed in the music. Have A Cigar has a very hard edge to it, Roy Harper’s vocals do not sound anything like the version from Wish You Were Here, it is well know that Roy was pissed earlier in the day and this comes through in his vocal. The tape edit at the end is seamless and very smooth.

The second set fares much better, the band has been playing the Dark Side suite for three years at this point and they have a comfort level with playing it, the heavy breathing just prior to the “I’ve always been mad” is met with much applause. The source from Recorder 3 is excellent and similar to the Sigma 74 release, better balance and very clear with just a minute amount of hiss it is a joy to listen to. The gap during Any Colour You Like is patched with Recorder 1 from 6:29 to 7:09 and is seamless and well handled, yet is a bit jarring, you are lost in the performance with excellent sound and the source change is very noticeable. The band is augmented by backing singers and Dick Perry on sax that lend to the full production of the piece yet the band do sound tired, and one can wonder if they were tired of playing the piece by this time. Another last, the band plays Echoes for the final time with Roger and thanks to The Dark Side Of The Moon elevates the performance, the reviews were crap but the performance is more than passable as judged from the audience response at its conclusion.

The label gives us some very relevant bonus tracks for this release, the outtakes from Wish You Were Here that surfaced last year. Previous releases were The Extraction Tapes: From Abbey Road To Britannia Row (Extraction CD001), Wish You Were Here Outtakes (Sigma 109), and From Abbey Road To Britannia Row The Extraction Tapes (Archive Master Series). The sound quality is on par with at least the Extraction and Archive Master Series versions, I do not own the Sigma title so cannot compare. What I do know is that those versions sounds as if they were source from vinyl as you can hear some very light surface noise on them (not the digital flaws found on the Animals outtakes), the versions found here are extremely clean, so either someone spent time cleaning them up or they are sourced from a tape. Whatever the case they are excellent, and if you have not heard them they are one more reason to invest in this title.

As previously stated the packaging is superb, typical Eat A Peach mini LP style jacket with a cover shot using an aerial view of the event with bicycle parts interspersed throughout and live shots and crowd shots on the back. Each CD sleeve is unique, the first features a road with the bike parts with a rear showing the site maps and track listing. The second sleeve has a blue colored event program cover as well as a different aerial shot and track listings. The third sleeve has a live shot of Roger as well as a ticket stub from the concert, all three CD’s have pictures on them and all three are slightly different and there is an 8 page booklet included with a historical view from the Lazy Goalkeeper as well as many live and back stage shots of the group. This release has it all, sound that is as good as the best previous titles, very relevant bonus tracks giving value for money, and superior packaging and presentation make this an excellent title to own.

Pink Floyd - 1975 - Rave Master Matrix

Pink Floyd
June 18, 1975
Boston Garden
Boston, MA



101. Raving And Drooling  13:06
102. You've Gotta Be Crazy  13:49
103. Shine On You Crazy Diamond I-V  12:26
104. Have A Cigar  4:34
105. Shine On You Crazy Diamond VI-IX  12:06

201. Speak To Me  5:44
202. Breathe  2:48
203. On The Run  4:57
204. Time > Breathe (reprise)  6:09
205. The Great Gig In The Sky  6:03
206. Money  8:05
207. Us And Them  7:33
208. Any Colour You Like  8:27
209. Brain Damage  3:52
210. Eclipse   4:25
211. Echoes  22:25


With several unique tapes and a pressing history dating back to the days of vinyl, Pink Floyd’s June 18th, 1975 Boston Gardens show is one of their most familiar shows.  The vinyl and early compact disc releases utilized a good but thin and fragmented recording.  In the late nineties the Hopkins tape surface and was used for subsequent CD releases including Echoes in the Gardens (Heartbreakers HB-801-1/2), Raving & Drooling (Watch Tower WT2004124/5) and Nice Live Pair (Highland HL677/8).  The latter was issued in both a four disc edition, where it was coupled with the June 17th Nassau Coliseum show, and separately as Live At The Garden. 

Sigma released this show two times. Rave Master (Sigma 3) is another version of the Hopkins tape and its follow-up Definitive Rave Master (Sigma 52) utilizes the excellent Lampinski recording. 

Rave Master Matrix is the third time Sigma released this show.  This time, they use a matrix edit between the Hopkins and the Lampinki tapes.  Their attempt is to try to marry the clarity of the former recording with the liveliness of the latter and they come close to perfection.  Except for four short imbalances, it’s an amazing edit and worth having.

The set list is the same as they introduced the previous summer when they played several gigs in France.  It is admirable for a band to have the unmitigated hubris to devote the first hour of the show to unreleased, new musical compositions. 

All of the new songs in some way address the devastating effects of the insincerity in the music industry, both universally and with Syd Barrett in particular.  “Raving And Drooling” sounds massive as it crawls across the stage.  “You Gotta Be Crazy,” introduced by Waters as “another new song,” is played at a slower tempo than the versions the previous year.  “This one…(choking noises)…is called ‘Shine On You Crazy Diamond.” 

Compared to the first two songs, these three are much more polished and closer to their final arrangements which is probably why they chose to record them for the next album.  As Waters sings “Have A Cigar” his voice doesn’t crack much.  It is still one of the great, unsolved Pink Floyd mysteries why he wrote a song out of his range.  Gilmour might have been able to handle it, but sonorous voice would clash with the hostility of the lyrics.

The second disc contains the second half of the show, the entire Dark Side Of The Moon, and the encore “Echoes.”  “Speak To Me” is very long and the audience clap along with the heartbeat as it fills the rafters of the Garden.  The excellence of this recording is more apparent on this disc since it does a great job capturing all of the sound effects employed by the band.  The clarity of the detail on this tape is nothing short of astonishing as the auxiliary sounds swirl around.  The synthesized chaos of “On The Run” is a pure adrenaline rush.

“The Great Gig In The Sky” has an interesting jazz interlude in the middle.  The cash registers before “Money” seem to shake the seats as the band deliver a hot version of the song.  Parry plays a sultry saxophone solo before Gilmour’s studied guitar solo.  “Any Colour You Like” is more than eight minutes a jamming before the piece’s finale of “Brain Damage” and “Eclipse.”  After Waters thanks everybody for coming the band play a twenty-two minute version of “Echoes” as the encore.

Rave Master Matrix is a really nice piece of work and comes close to being the definitive version of the Boston show.

Pink Floyd - 1975 - Nassau 1975 Day 2

Pink Floyd
June 17, 1975
Nassau Coliseum,
Uniondale, NY

Sigma43

101. Tuning
102. Raving And Drooling
103. You Gotta Be Crazy
104. Shine On You Crazy Diamond I-V >
105. Have A Cigar
106. Shine On You Crazy Diamond VI-IX

201. Speak To Me
202. Breathe
203. On The Run
204. Time
205. Breathe (reprise)
206. The Great Gig In The Sky
207. Money
208. Us And Them
209. Any Colour You Like
210. Brain Damage
211. Eclipse
212. encore call - tuning
213. Echoes


Nassau 1975 Day 2 (Sigma 43) serves as both a sequel to Nassau 1975 Day 1 (Sigma 22), the three disc set with the June 16th show and as a corrective for the popular yet criticized Wishes, Echoes, And Desires (Godfather GR267/268).  Godfather were the first to offer a significant upgrade over Nice Live Pair (Highland HL675/676/677/678), a four disc set coupled with the June 18th Boston show and individually as Live At The Coliseum (Highland HL675/676), but that release was marred by digital clicks in the first song and at points on disc two.  Sigma 43 maintains the excellent sound quality of the Godfather yet does not have any flaws on the tape whatsoever and can be considered definitive at this point.

A review was published in the New York Times after the second show which interestingly singled out Richard Wright for particular praise.  The author John Rockwell writes:  “While the rock world is steadily inundated by German space-rock ensembles, Pink Floyd keeps indefatigably making music that antedated the Germans and is superior to nearly all of them.

“Not that the English quartet, which played the first of two consecutive evening concerts Monday at the Nassau Coliseum, is purely devoted to rambling, hypnotic instrumentals of the sort the Germans favor.  Pink Floyd can boogie, almost, what with the crunching rhythm section of Rogers Waters (bass guitar) and Nicky Mason (drums), plus a fervent saxophone player and two black women singers. 

“And the group’s songs have an unusually suggestive poetic quality – great literature, even, in the context of the flatulent pseudo-mythology of so many recent space rock lyrics – and the singing isn’t half bad at all, especially that of Dave Gilmour, the lead guitarist.

“But the core of the act remains the instrumentals, and the core of those instrumentals is Rick Wright, the keyboard player.  Mr. Wright makes music of a coloristic richness that is more entrancing that almost any of his competition that one can think of, and yet his flights say firmly grounded in lucidity and rhythmic directness.  And for all the others’ gifts on their own, they do their best work in support of Mr. Wright.” (“Pink Floyd Plays At Rambling Best:  English Quartet Is Sparked By Wright On Keyboards,” John Rockwell, June 18th, 1975) 

The tape begins when the house lights go down and the band walk on stage.  “Wait a minute.  Just wait a minute” Roger Waters says.  “Okay this is a new tune called ‘Raving And Drooling I Fell On His Neck With A Scream.'”  This song would undergo minor variations in its development before being rewritten as “Sheep.”  On this night Wright plays around with some unique keyboard motifs in the first half of the piece. “You Gotta Be Crazy” is sung more than narrated (as was the case in its earliest incarnation) and is missing the barking dog interlude after “dragged down by the stone….”

Waters makes the normal reference to their founder before “Shine On You Crazy  Diamond Parts 1-5″ when he says, “This is the last new song tonight so make the best of it.  It is partly to do with Syd Barrett who used to be in our band.”  Just before the ten minute mark one of the roadies plays the money sound effects by accident, the sound of coins falling into the cash register.  In the final section, during Part 8 Wright takes an interesting solo.  The second half of the show is devoted to Dark Side Of The Moonand is given a flawless delivery with Gilmour’s wailing guitar in “Money” a standout. Nassau 1975 Day 2 is packaged in a standard jewel case with artwork from the tour. 


Pink Floyd - 1975 - Seattle Master Reels

Pink Floyd
April 10th, 1975
Seattle Center Coliseum
Seattle, WA 


Sigma 58

101. Intro
102. Raving And Drooling
103. You Gotta Be Crazy
104. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 1-5)
105. Have A Cigar
106. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 6-9)

201. Speak To Me
202. Breathe
203. On The Run
204. Time
205. Breathe (Reprise)
206. The Great Gig In The Sky
207. Money
208 .Us And Them
209. Any Colour You Like
210. Brain Damage
211. Eclipse

301. Audience
302. Echoes


Pink Floyd entered Abbey Road studios in January 1975 to record their anticpated follow up to the seminal Dark Side Of The Moon.  Their intention was to polish and evolve the three songs they were playing live the previous year, “Raving And Drooling,” “You Gotta Be Crazy” and “Shine On You Crazy Diamond.” 

So the story goes their hearts weren’t into recording the album and tensions were raised when Roger Waters decided to make an artistic decision by splitting “Shine On” into two parts, dropping the other two songs, and making Wish You Were Here into a concept album.  Recording of the LP went on throughout the summer before its September release and in the meantime they took two breaks from recording to tour north America twice. 

The first tour was a short, three-week trek down the west coast beginning on April 8th in Vancouver and culminating with five sold out shows at the Sports Arena in Los Angeles.

Highland were the first label to release Seattle on silver disc in 2001 on Dark Side Last Tour (Highland HL571/572). It is a good to very good but slightly distant recording that can be a little fuzzy at times.  Sigma use the master tapes (according to the title) for Seattle Master Reels.  Sigma didn’t apply much remastering to the tape.  It’s not as loud as Highland and the echo is more pronounced.   

There are small cuts on the tape between “Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts 1-5)” and “Have A Cigar,” “Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts 6-9)” and “Speak To Me,” and “Eclipse” and “Echoes.” The setlist is similar to the 1974 shows with the new material being played in the first half, the Dark Side Of The Moon in the second and “Echoes” serving as encore. 

The tape begins when the house lights go down and someone on stage (Waters?) is whistling Irving Berlin’s “There’s No Business Like Show Business” but very slow, out of key and sarcastic. The way it is whistled fits well into the attitude of the new songs and the direction the new album was heading, being a full frontal attack upon the same music industry that made them unbelieveably rich and famous.  (They should have written a song called “Bite The Hand” or something). 

“Raving And Drooling” is a bit rusty the beginning but improves as it goes on.  At about the ten minute mark Mason’s drums become predominate lending a tribal tone to the piece.  There seem to be problems with the equipment and after the song Waters says, “We just, we just have to solve one small problem.  It takes about two minutes before we get on.” 

“You Gotta Be Crazy” comes off much better than the first song, and “Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts 1-5)” is introduced as another new song.  In lieu of a saxophone solo in part five Wright plays a keyboard solo.  “Have A Cigar” is played for the second time ever.  Gilmour and Waters share vocals on the verses but Waters sings the chorus alone with cracking voice. 

Gilmour’s solo is different than the commercial version being much lower and chunkier before the song abruptly ends.  It seems the transition into the next song still had yet to be rehearsed.  At the end of “Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts 6-9)” the audience lets out a terrific shout. 

After the intermission they come back with Dark Side.  This is probably what most people there came to see and they roar with approval.  The long, taped introduction is an excuse for the audience to cheer along with the stage show before the first song “Breathe.”  Wright takes control of “On The Run” and plays surreal sounding keyboards that sound even spookier in this recording. 

He again asserts himself by the end of “Great Gig In The Sky” by playing a jazzy little tune before the cash registers start sounding for “Money.”  Dick Parry is absent on this song and Gilmour plays a long solo.  After the proper solo he spits out heavy metal squeals and low-end funk riffs until Mason reigns him in and brings the song to the final verse.

“Us & Them” sounds gorgeous in this recording including Parry’s saxophone.  The back up singers are audible in this recording beginning the verses for Gilmour to complete.  “Any Colour You Like” is almost ten minutes long with an effective jam in the middle.  “Echoes” is played as the encore and clocks in at almost a half hour.  Parry again asserts himself in the middle before the seagull section and the finale sounds very spacey in this recording. 

Seattle Master Reels is packaged in a fatboy jewel case with tour pictures.  Sigma also continue the practice of placing Pink Floyd 1975 shows onto three CDs when it could fit onto two.  Overall it is a solid release by the label which is recommended for those who do not already have this show.