Monday, June 6, 2016

Masayuki Takayanagi - 2001 - Gradually Projection

Masayuki Takayanagi & Kaoru Abe
2001
Gradually Projection




01. Gradually Projection 49:00

Alto Saxophone, Shakuhachi [With Reed], Bass Clarinet [Bcl], Harmonica [Hca] –  Abe Kaoru
Guitar – Masayuki Takayanagi

Notes
Recorded on July 9, 1970 at Station '70, Shibuya.




Gradually Projection is reissue of a 1970 recording that paired two of Japan's most innovative improvisers, reedist Kaoru Abe, who died in 1979, and guitarist Masayuki Takayanagi, who is well-known for his work with the New Directions Ensemble. DIW has a program going to reissue all of the recordings from Abe's brief career, featuring him in various solo, trio, and duo settings. PSF is doing the same with Takayanagi, issuing his New Directions material and solo recordings. Neither man ever achieved anything near what they accomplished on Gradually Projection, however. This is not an assault in the sense of, say, an Evan Parker record where he is exploring all the possible microtones that can be wrung from his horn in a given space at a given time. Nor does Takayanagi's restrained, unwieldy guitar playing draw the same scratches in the dirt that Derek Bailey's do, though there are similarities in both cases. Given that this was recorded in 1970, it is unlikely this pair heard the British duo or vice versa, though they may have heard of them. What's there is here, a deep listening, intuitive listening that takes into account more than other players' breath, posture, and manner of response -- rather than attack. Abe primarily plays alto (and makes it sound like a tenor) and bass clarinet here, though he digs out his trademark harmonica and a reeded shakuhachi flute. He has no interest in any of his instruments remaining what they are. His attempt throughout is to transform their texture, voice, and in some cases by removing some tubing from the alto, their physical bodies as well. Takayanagi's acoustic guitar is more subtle but nonetheless intense, disorienting in the percussive manner in which he pulls at strings and hammers on chords. There is the feeling of Coltrane and Archie Shepp's New Thing at Newport here, or the early Anthony Braxton/Derek Bailey duets, but still this disc slips out from underneath the comparisons as unique. What Gradually Projection is about is the projection of newly realized tonalities into the body of sound as a whole. Between the musicians -- who were placed very close to one another facing each other in the session -- microtones are tossed back and forth, and in the space between, new ones seem to appear. Abe also creates a microphonic environment for Takayanagi to play from, in somber, reflective passages and in angry intense ones as the work vacillates between them randomly, always dictated by the dynamic of tone and phrase. Dramatic episodes are few, though the dynamic range is colorful and varied. Over 49 minutes in 1970, bridges to the musical past were burned, leaving only the cracked sky of a present that was asserting itself with an informed, sophisticated, yet primal energetic roar. To call this disc a classic is to radically understate the case. This title created a Japanese underground in music that continues to flower in 2001 in all kinds of settings. For any person interested in vanguard jazz, free improvisation, or the avant-garde in music, this disc is essential listening.

Masayuki Takayanagi - 2000 - Kaitai Teki Kohkan

Masayuki Takayanagi & Kaoru Abe
2000
Kaitai Teki Kohkan




01. Untitled
02. Untitled

Recorded live on June 28, 1970 at small hall of Kosei Nenkin Kaikan, Tokyo


Masayuki Takayanagi : guitar
Kaoru Abe : alt. saxophone, bass clarinet, harmonica




Masayuki 'Jojo' Takayanagi (1932 - 1991) was a Japanese jazz / free improvisational musician. He was active in the Japanese jazz scene from the late 1950s. In the 1960s he formed New Directions, which recorded four albums; Independence (1970), New Direction - Call In Question (1970), Free Form Suite (1977), and Lonely Woman (1982). He has also recorded several albums with saxophonist Kaoru Abe, including Gradually Projection and Mass Projection.

Kaoru Abe (May 3, 1949 - September 9, 1978) was a Japanese free jazz alto saxophonist, who generally played solo. He died young from a drug overdose, and has been romanticized in the Japanese jazz underground. He was married to the author Izumi Suzuki, and was the subject of the film Endless Waltz by the director Koji Wakamatsu. Collaborators included Masayuki Takayanagi, Derek Bailey, Sabu Toyozumi, Aquirax Aida, and Motoharu Yoshizawa. Those said to have been influenced by Abe include Otomo Yoshihide and Masayoshi Urabe. He was cousin with the famous singer Kyu Sakamoto.  (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaoru_Abe)
This recording dating from 1970 is duo free improvisation from two of the Japanese avant-garde music scene's most vital practitioners. Both have since passed on and left some of the most challenging music in the world of post- jazz improvisation. It has been said that this duo are like the Tokyo equivalent of Derek Bailey and Evan Parker and it is easy to see why. Some the New Direction Unit recordings of the '60 predate noise and free improvised music of the following decades in that they deployment of feedback-guitar and noise are frankly shocking when we consider the culture and the era in which these were produced. Fans of the extreme end of improvised music -- be it Sonny Sharrock, Peter Brotzmann, or Borbetomagus should give at least an hour of your attention to this incredible recording -- this could only be matched by the singular music of Cecil Taylor for total outward-bound energy. Exceptional recording fidelity and production on the Japanese D.I.W label, this is a must for collectors of free jazz and Japanese noise alike.

This recording dating from 1970 is duo free improvisation from two of the Japanese avant-garde music scene's most vital practitioners. Both have since passed on and left some of the most challenging music in the world of post- jazz improvisation. It has been said that this duo are like the Tokyo equivalent of Derek Bailey and Evan Parker and it is easy to see why. Some the New Direction Unit recordings of the '60 predate noise and free improvised music of the following decades in that they deployment of feedback-guitar and noise are frankly shocking when we consider the culture and the era in which these were produced. Fans of the extreme end of improvised music -- be it Sonny Sharrock, Peter Brotzmann, or Borbetomagus should give at least an hour of your attention to this incredible recording -- this could only be matched by the singular music of Cecil Taylor for total outward-bound energy. Exceptional recording fidelity and production on the Japanese D.I.W label, this is a must for collectors of free jazz and Japanese noise alike.

Masayuki Takayanagi - 1995 - Live Independence 1970

Masayuki Takayanagi 
1995
Live Independence 1970




01. Herdsman's Pipe Of Spain (21:27)
02. Mass Projection (21:07)

Bass – Motoharu Yoshizawa
Drums – Sabu Toyozumi
Guitar – Masayuki Takayanagi






Another previously unreleased archive release from Takayanagi, the premier Japanese free-guitar stylist. Recorded live in 1970, waves of trademark feedback abound, but also some more serene segments with flute, freedom atmospherics, etc. Not as overwhelmingly brain-bombing as his previous release on the label (PSF 41), but definitely another important piece in the crucial documentation of Takayanagi's career.

Masayuki Takayanagi - 1995 - El Pulso

Loco Takayanagi y Les Pobres 
1995 
El Pulso





01. Leguisamo Solo 2:23
02. Murmullos 2:36
03.. Silencio 2:45
04 Milonga Del 900 2:01
05. Ataniche 2:18
06. Ay, Aurora 2:31
07. Intimas 2:27
08. Mi Buenos Aires Querido 4:42
09. Dos Amigos 4:11
10. Margaritas 2:43
11. Volver 2:44
12. Sol Tropical 2:45
13. Amemonos 2:55
14. Ausencia 2:16
15. Caprichosa 2:53
16. Medallita De La Suerte 2:33
17. El Tango Es Azul 2:53


Contrabass Nobuyoshi Ino
Guitar Akira Matsuoka
Guitar Hidetoshi Tanba
Guitar Masayuki Takayanagi
Guitar Shinichi Miyazaki
Guitar Tanryo Sakamoto
Guitar Toshio Sato
Guitar [7 String] Seijiro Ikeda



One of the strangest items in the Takayanagi (New Direction Unit) discography:- an acoustic guitar nontet playing covers of South American tango, milonga, vals, rumba, &c.

Recorded 1 August 1990 at Pit Inn, Tokyo (tracks 1-14), and 28 October 1990 at JeanJean, Tokyo (tracks 15-17).