Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Moondog - 1956 - More Moondog

Moondog 
1956
More Moondog




01. A Duet - Queen Elizabeth Whistle And Bamboo Pipe
02. Conversation And Music At 51st St. & 6th Ave. (New York City)
03. Hardshoe (7/4) Ray Malone
04. Tugboat Tocatta
05. Autumn
06. Seven Beat Suite (3 Parts)
07. Oo Solo (6/4)
08. Rehearsal Of Violetta's "Barefoot Dance"
09. Oo Solo (2/4)
10. Ostrich Feathers Played On Drums
11. Oboe Round
12. Chant
13. All Is Loneliness
14. Sextet (Oo)
15. Fiesta Piano Solo
16. Moondog Monologue


Piano, Vocals – Moondog
Tap Dance – Ray Malone (tracks: 03)

1st pressing on yellow & black fireworks label with Address "446 W. 50th., N. Y. C." printed on and "Long playing microgroove" along bottom of label on both sides.




Cover Notes

Several of the instruments used on this album were invented by Moondog
Oo - a triangular stringed instrument struck with a clave.
Trimba - a triangular-shaped drum.
Yuhk - a log suspended form a tripod - hit with two rubber mallets held in right hand.
Tuji - a series of mounted sticks of graduated lengths.

Those who have looked forward to another edition of Moondog following his first Prestige album (LP 7042) will welcome this collection, because it is MOONDOG, but MORE so.
The unexpected directions taken by Moondog´s roving imaginations are represented here by sixteen examples. His most striking characteristics, a refusal to recognize the customary separation between sound and the academic definition of music is persuasively shown again.
With an allmost naive indifference to the sheer volume of his foil, Moondog attempts a duett with the deep-throated whistle of the Queen Elizabeth and his Bamboo Pipe. His preoccupation with waterfront sounds it perhaps more successfully realised in the Tugboat Toccata. In Hardshoe, Ray Malone´s crisp tap dancing is superimposed upon Moondog´s equally crisp, though hardly conventional rhythmic accompaniment.
It is thus a fusionist that Moondog often achieves his most rewarding results. He is not restricted solely to the matching of disorganized sounds and the organized sounds of music. Autumn for example, contains an appealing combination of french horn, reed and Moondog´s self-styled rhythmic instruments.
More Moondog also affords several intimate glimpses into the personal life and philosophy of Moondog. The rest period during Violetta´s Barefoot Dance lesson permits us to join Moondog as he plays with a dog, and entertains his guests, until the stern voice of the teacher calls for a resumption of work, and music. The long and discursive Monologue by Moondog is of such an individualized nature, I would rather you draw your own conclusions.
The wide variety of sounds which have been absorbed into Moondog´s world of music serves another, though incidental purpose. Today´s deep interest in faithful sound reproduction will make this album a welcome companion to your phonograph. If you are a HI FI buff, MORE MOONDOG will "fuse" well with your system.

Notes by Robert S. Altshuler



Moondog's second Prestige album solidified his standing as a rare breed: a musician whose work was both highly experimental and approachable by listeners without a taste for the avant-garde. That's what enabled him to make a living as a street musician in Manhattan, after all. On this album he produced a variety of wonderful shaking percussion sounds and rhythms with an oo (a triangular stringed instrument struck with a clave) and even "Ostrich Feathers Played on Drum" (as the title on one track reads). The percussion is sometimes backed by sparse, Asian-sounding melodies, and there are also unpredictable interludes of solo piano, street sounds, and an eight-minute "Moondog Monologue." One of the round-like vocal numbers, the minute-long and inexpressibly sad "All Is Loneliness," found an unexpected second life in the 1960s when it was covered by Big Brother & the Holding Company. The album is now available as part of a single-disc CD reissue that also includes the whole of his subsequent Prestige album, The Story of Moondog (1957).

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