Saturday, August 20, 2016

David Thomas & The Pedestrians - 1981 - The Sound Of The Sand And Other Songs Of The Pedestrian

David Thomas & The Pedestrians 
1981
The Sound Of The Sand And Other Songs Of The Pedestrian




01. The Pedestrians The Birds Are Good Ideas 1:55
02. The Pedestrians Yiki Tiki 2:15
03. The Golden Palominos The Crickets In The Flats 4:59
04. The Pedestrians Sound Of The Sand 3:27
05. The Pedestrians The New Atom Mine 5:13
06. The Pedestrians Big Dreams 2:20
07. The Trees Happy To See You 3:30
08. The Golden Palominos Crush This Horn, Pt. 2 1:43
09. The Pedestrians Confuse Did 2:31
10. The Eggs Sloop John B 5:10
11. The Pedestrians Man's Best Friend 4:25

The Pedestrians
Anton Fier – drums and percussion
John Greaves – bass guitar (A5, B4)
Philip Moxham – bass guitar
Allen Ravenstine – synthesizer
David Thomas – lead vocals
Richard Thompson – guitar and dulcimer
Eddie "Tan Tan" Thornton – trumpet
Mayo Thompson – accordion (B6)


The Golden Palominos
Anton Fier – drums and percussion
John Greaves – bass guitar, piano
Richard Thompson – guitar and dulcimer
Eddie "Tan Tan" Thornton – trumpet

The Trees 
Ralph Carney – saxophone and oboe
Alan Greenblatt – guitar
Paul Hamann – bass guitar
Scott Krauss – drums
Allen Ravenstine – synthesizer

The Eggs
Chris Cutler – drums
Eddie "Tan Tan" Thornton – trumpet





With Pere Ubu, singer and songwriter David Thomas sometimes comes across as a slightly loopy misanthrope. But his solo work, while still usually based in rock & roll forms, has tended to be more whimsically pastoral (if no less loopy). This, his first solo album, features songs with titles like "The Birds Are a Good Idea," "Man's Best Friend," and "Crickets in the Flats" and also includes an utterly unattractive deconstruction of the calypso tune "Sloop John B." The backing band includes drummer Anton Fier, a frequent Thomas collaborator, and, rather bizarrely, the great British folk-rock guitarist Richard Thompson. Thompson acquits himself nicely, as you'd expect, but plays as if he's not quite sure what he's doing there -- he contributes an appropriately bouncy chord vamp on the polka-fied "Happy to See You," but doesn't let loose on the bridge where he could have; on "Crush This Horn, Part Two" he's harnessed to an atonal chord progression that doesn't give him any leeway. On the other hand, Allen Ravenstine's overdubbed synth doodles work very nicely on that track. Overall, this is one that Thomas fans will surely love and that will leave everyone else, as Thompson seems to be, wondering what's going on.

2 comments:



  1. http://www.filefactory.com/file/490ui44ef7bp/3994.rar

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  2. Very nice, thank you! Life stinks and I need a drink!!

    ReplyDelete