Sunday, January 3, 2016

Aguaturbia - 1969 - Aguaturbia

Aguaturbia
1969
Aguaturbia



01. Somebody to Love [3.04]
02. Erotica [3.50]
03. Rollin' 'N' Tumblin' [3.05]
04. Ah Ah Ah Ay [2.49]
05. Crimson & Clover [10.35]
06. Heartbreaker [5.42]
07. Blues on the Westside [6.16]
08. Waterfall [3.46]
09. Evol [8.44]
10. I Wonder Who [2.56]
11. Aguaturbia [2.22]


Denise Corales (vocals)
Carlos Corales (guitar)
Willy Cavada (drums)
Ricardo Briones (bass)


Pretty heavy South American psych sung mostly in English.  The focus for the majority of this album is the heavy guitar riffs which prove to be very entertaining.  The opening cover of "Sombody to Love" is not too good, mostly because the female vocals are so far from Grace's powerful voice.  The second and probably worst track "Erotica" consists of female moaning with lighter guitar/percussion in the background.    The very lengthy cover of Tommy James's hit "Crimson and Clover" is very solid, with comparable vocals to the original.  "Heartbreaker" and "Waterfall"  showcase the characteristic heavy guitar with much success.  The closing track is sung in Spanish and is not very good either.  Though not all tracks are good, most prove to be very well done.  The music is almost never in question, but the female vocals on many of the tracks really seem out of place.

Aguaturbia was a unique experience in the history of rock, even today his name is associated with the roots of the movement in Chile. With a hippie inspiration, psychedelic characteristic and recognized authentic imitation in style and appearance of musicians like Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin were the ingredients that gave life to this quartet, perhaps the first local cult band. Its existence did not exceed five years and never achieved massive success, however, both musical quality and the irreverence of his discourse are recognized today as forces managed to shake Chilean society. Estabilished in May 1968, at the height of the 60s new libertarian tendencies, their leader Carlos Corales, was one of the most important guitarists of the local environment (The Tickets, Pat Henry and The Blue Devils and Los Jockers), which together with Denise on vocals, Willy Cavada on drums and Ricardo Briones on bass, shaped a band that never stopped looking at what the U.S. and England produced to expand his blues-rock and psychedelic music.

They started playing covers in small clubs in Santiago, but eventually were encouraged in their own compositions (sung in English, like most local rock bands of the time). The themes concerning love, peace and the defense of their appearance held their debut album in 1970. Before recording, Corales traveled to the U.S. to buy new instruments. However, this well planned debut, recorded in just three days, would get sparks between the public, though not precisely for its musical arguments. Aguaturbia’s cover showed the four musicians naked, sitting in a circle with a neutral expression on their faces. The album, released under the RCA label, had an acceptable sale and just a few months later, they released his successor Aguaturbia II (or Aguaturbia Volume 2), which created a new uproar, this time, for a photograph that appeared Denise crucified, inspired by Dali’s (magnificent) Christ of Saint John of the Cross. The controversy was mixed with political and social upheavals from Popular Unity (Allende’s party) and the activity of the group lowered its intensity. On late 1970, after been invited to participate in the famous Red Rock festival in Santiago (due to the general chaos that afternoon did not even get onto the stage), the band decided to try his luck in the U.S. They settled in New York to work and study, and formed a group called Sun, where his music was welcomed in some quarters and allowed them survive. The band returned to Chile in 1973, with a different formation, after participating at the Viña del Mar festival the band finally ends in mid-74.

Unfortunately the drummer Willy Cavada died of a heart attack on early October, 2013. (RIP)

6 comments:



  1. http://filefactory.com/file/186hq1c25mcj/2799.rar

    ReplyDelete
  2. Aguaturbia was a unique experience in the history of rock, even today his name is associated with the roots of the movement in Chile. With a hippie inspiration, psychedelic characteristic and recognized authentic imitation in style and appearance of musicians like Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin were the ingredients that gave life to this quartet, perhaps the first local cult band. Its existence did not exceed five years and never achieved massive success, however, both musical quality and the irreverence of his discourse are recognized today as forces managed to shake Chilean society. Estabilished in May 1968, at the height of the 60s new libertarian tendencies, their leader Carlos Corales, was one of the most important guitarists of the local environment (The Tickets, Pat Henry and The Blue Devils and Los Jockers), which together with Denise on vocals, Willy Cavada on drums and Ricardo Briones on bass, shaped a band that never stopped looking at what the U.S. and England produced to expand his blues-rock and psychedelic music.

    They started playing covers in small clubs in Santiago, but eventually were encouraged in their own compositions (sung in English, like most local rock bands of the time). The themes concerning love, peace and the defense of their appearance held their debut album in 1970. Before recording, Corales traveled to the U.S. to buy new instruments. However, this well planned debut, recorded in just three days, would get sparks between the public, though not precisely for its musical arguments. Aguaturbia’s cover showed the four musicians naked, sitting in a circle with a neutral expression on their faces. The album, released under the RCA label, had an acceptable sale and just a few months later, they released his successor Aguaturbia II (or Aguaturbia Volume 2), which created a new uproar, this time, for a photograph that appeared Denise crucified, inspired by Dali’s (magnificent) Christ of Saint John of the Cross. The controversy was mixed with political and social upheavals from Popular Unity (Allende’s party) and the activity of the group lowered its intensity. On late 1970, after been invited to participate in the famous Red Rock festival in Santiago (due to the general chaos that afternoon did not even get onto the stage), the band decided to try his luck in the U.S. They settled in New York to work and study, and formed a group called Sun, where his music was welcomed in some quarters and allowed them survive. The band returned to Chile in 1973, with a different formation, after participating at the Viña del Mar festival the band finally ends in mid-74.

    Unfortunately the drummer Willy Cavada died of a heart attack on early October, 2013. (RIP)

    ReplyDelete
  3. personally i always preferred early Jaivas (saw them live a couple of times) and Blops to Aguaturbia... but they do have their moments!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow... probably you have incredible satisfaction and something to remember ... and as it was in the 70's,this all the more is an amazing thing, because the band still exists today ...In the environment of journalists who were really interested in rescuing the true rock roots of Chilean Los Blops were valued as one of the great Chilean bands of the 70s next to the Jaivas and Congress. Los Blops - "The Blops" (1970), "the Flying Pigeon" (1971) and "Locomotive" (1973) - progressive rock summits.
      Drago,thanks for conversation,you're doing a good job on your blog.
      I greet!

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    2. I saw Los Jaivas in the 70's as a kid and later in the early 80's in The Netherlands, and they were amazing. What really blew my mind was when the Voragine set came out... Blops I discovered thru an ex girlfriend in the 80's who had just fled Chile with her mother and both where Gatti fans, the mother told me about Blops, then some other Chilean refugee had a cassette he brought with him in 73 and so I heard them for the first time, actually that was the way I discovered much of South American rock, thru' the cassette tapes of the Chilean and Uruguayan refugees in Havana, Argentinians we had very few because Castro and Videla had a great relationship. But thru the other south americans we discovered Argentinian rock...and it was like... fuck! and you can do this rock thing in other languages than english...that's cool!...

      Maybe because its because of the source of all my early tapes of South American bands that I never got very much into Aguaturbia... Blops, Congreso, Jaivas had a very political edge (the folk bands like Inti-Illimani and so even more) and Aguaturbia at least at face value didnt have that political edge. Those were years when politics mattered and all my friends from Chile where card carrying certified MIR members still licking their (very literal) wounds back home.
      Look what you have done... made me take a trip down memory lane this early in the morning, well fuck it, it's five o clock somewhere, I'll go now and have a drink in memory of all the old friends that are not here anymore.

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    3. Hey Drago,
      I see that music is your passion (as for me) ... do not forget to...deflect the glass, for Lemmy ... and even a few, probably this he would have liked ..for me it is before noon, go for a walk with my old dog, and the occasion to visit a pub and have a beer ... greetings from Bydgoszcz (Poland)
      Adam.

      Delete