Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Shinki Chen - 1971 - Shinki Chen

Shinki Chen
1971
Shinki Chen





01. The Dark Sea Dream
02. Requiem of Confusion
03. Freedom of a Mad Paper Lantern
04. Gloomy Reflections
05. It was only Yesterday
06. Corpse
07. Farewell to Hypocrites

- Shinki Chen / guitar, bass, drums, piano
- George Yanagi / bass, vocals
- Shinichi Nogi / drums
- Hiro Yanagida / keyboards

Shinki Chen was one of the leading figures of the Japanese psychedelic rock scene in the early 70s, seen as a Jimi Hendrix type figure in Japan at the time, the last recorded material (there's some with the band Power House and Foodbrain) consists of this album and the later album released by a different bad line up known as Speed, Glue and Shinki and their debut Eve was released in 1971. Whilst the band's style is often compared to Krautrock cousins, it lacks the dreamy lack of direction that a lot of them have and does not have the bore factor of the lighter-weight progressive rock acts. Shinki Chen & Friends might lack Joey Smith's amphetamine fuelled drumming but is generally bluesier with lots of strange keyboard effects, a fuzzy bass line and a relatively weeping guitar sound.

SHINKI CHEN & FRIENDS was a short-time project of Sino-Japanese Shinki Chen, often mentioned as Nippon's Jimi Hendrix and one of the most celebrated guitarists on that island. He was born 1949 in Yokohama City and began to play at the age of fourteen. According to the development of the beat music he joined several Liverpool-styled and blues based bands founded by his friends. He even changed to play drums in between but soon came back to the guitar as his main instrument.

Music releases with his collaboration are known from the band Power House (1969) with cover songs played very unusual and Foodbrain (1970). He was also working in a theatre ensemble for the musical HAIR until he produced his solo album 'Shinki Chen & Friends' in 1971 supported by George Yanagi (bass, vocals), Shinichi Nogi (drums) and former Foodbrain band mate Hiro Yanagida (keyboards).

The cover is showing him with afro look and perpetual cigarette dangling from his lips. This album is characterized by a special blend of traditional blues rock and spaced-out psychedelic elements. After that he produced two other albums with the project 'Speed, Glue & Shinki' - 'Eve' (1971) and an eponymous double LP (1972). No informations were given what happened with him afterwards.

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Carmen Maki & Blues Creation - 1971 - Carmen Maki & Blues Creation

Carmen Maki & Blues Creation
1971
Carmen Maki & Blues Creation




01. Understand
02. And You
03. Lord, I Can't Be Going No More
04. Empty Heart
05. Motherless Child
06. I Can't Live for Today
07. Mean Old Boogie
08. St. James Infirmary


Released at the same time as Demon And Eleven Children, the album the beautiful Carmen Maki recorded with the band Blues Creation, this heavy rock guitar monster reminds us that Eleven Children isn’t the only heavy album from this ensemble. Maki was probably one of the strongest voices of Japanese rock and is featured here doing her finest Grace Slick impression and very well too! Lots of brutal, non-stop wailing guitar but some mellow, bluesy psychedelic rock numbers too. Maki went on to form her own band, Oz, but this is the collaboration for which she will be best remembered. Highly recommended.


Blues Creation - 1971 - Demon & Eleven Children

Blues Creation
1971
Demon & Eleven Children




01. Atomic Bombs Away
02. Mississippi Mountain Blues
03. Just I Was Born
04. Sorrow
05. One Summer Day
06. Brain Buster
07. Sooner Or Later
08. Demon & Elevan Children

Blues Creation was formed by guitarists Kazuo Takeda, Koh Eiryu and singer Fumio Nunoya, in early 1969, after the dissolution of their Group Sounds outfit The Bickies. Highly influenced by Cream and The Yardbirds, Takeda joined forces with school friends Takayuki Noji, Shinichi Tashiro, and lead singer Fumio Nunoya. Formerly vocalist with Taboo, a heavy band led by future Happy End guitarist Eiichi Otaki, Nunoya was also searching for an even heavier sound, and the results of the new American-influenced experiment were released in October 1969, as Blues Creation.

Singer Fumio Nunoya soon found himself edged out of artistic decisions by the supremely confident Takeda, and thereafter left to form his own band Dew. Whilst searching around throughout 1970 for a new singer, guitarist Takeda heard the new even more strung out music of Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Eric Clapton’s solo LP CLAPTON, and Leslie West’s Mountain, and decided he should take the opportunity to start again from scratch. Takeda enlisted bassist Masashi Saeki and drummer Akiyoshi Higuchi for the new line-up, and eschewed the previous covers style in favour of his own compositions. With the new Blues Creation fronted by singer Hiromi Osawa, Kazuo Takeda recorded what has come to be regarded as his masterpiece in the form of DEMON & ELEVEN CHILDREN.

This album was recorded at the Japan Folk Jamboree, and is a full-on gem of a record, but Takeda was now widely known as a true Japanese guitar hero, and – as ever – had set his sights higher and higher. He split Blues Creation the following year, leaving for London in late 1972.

Blues Creation - 1969 - Blues Creation

Blues Creation
1969
Blues Creation




01. Checkin Up On My Baby
02. Steppin Out
03. Smoke Stack Lightning
04. Double Crossing Time
05. I Cant Keep From Crying
06. Spoonful
07. Rollin Ans Tumblin
08. All Your Love

Blues Creation was formed by guitarists Kazuo Takeda, Koh Eiryu and singer Fumio Nunoya, in early 1969, after the dissolution of their Group Sounds outfit The Bickies. Highly influenced by Cream and The Yardbirds, Takeda joined forces with school friends Takayuki Noji, Shinichi Tashiro, and lead singer Fumio Nunoya. Formerly vocalist with Taboo, a heavy band led by future Happy End guitarist Eiichi Otaki, Nunoya was also searching for an even heavier sound, and the results of the new American-influenced experiment were released in October 1969, as BLUES CREATION, on the Polydor label.

Nowadays, the results sound fairly tame and typical of the time, and though their versions of ‘Smokestack Lightning’ and ‘Spoonful’ feature some nice slurred vocals from Nunoya, it’s difficult to find any 1969 Japanese band that did not attempt the latter song at one time or another. Singer Fumio Nunoya soon found himself edged out of artistic decisions by the supremely confident Takeda, and thereafter left to form his own band Dew. Whilst searching around throughout 1970 for a new singer, guitarist Takeda heard the new even more strung out music of Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Eric Clapton’s solo LP CLAPTON, and Leslie West’s Mountain, and decided he should take the opportunity to start again from scratch.

Takeda enlisted bassist Masashi Saeki and drummer Akiyoshi Higuchi for the new line-up, and eschewed the previous covers style in favour of his own compositions. With the new Blues Creation fronted by singer Hiromi Osawa, Kazuo Takeda recorded what has come to be regarded as his masterpiece in the form of DEMON & ELEVEN CHILDREN. Despite its obvious influences, this eight song barrage of sound was both complex and supremely individual, and showed clear influences from his fellow countrymen and free-thinkers the newly-formed Flower Travellin’ Band. Opening with the super stoner anthem ‘Atomic Bombs Away’, the LP included such other delightful song titles as ‘Brain Baster’, and featured a classic original ‘Mississippi Mountain Blues’, which mirrored the heaviness located within the grooves of Flower Travellin’ Band’s juggernaut ‘Louisiana Blues’.

Later on in 1971, CARMEN MAKI & BLUES CREATION was released by Polydor, which utilised the massive (and unexpected) success of Blues Creation as a vehicle for the promotion of the beautiful young female blues singer Carmen Maki. The LP featured songs mostly by Takeda, plus covers of such standards as ‘St. James’ Infirmary’, and had been recorded during the sessions for DEMON & ELEVEN CHILDREN. This LP was also well received, but Maki’s cardboard and shrill pedestrian presence so detracted from the overall heaviness of the sound that each song became a plod-o-thon of brain crushing dimensions. Maki’s so-called Janis Joplinisms are even less believable than the reedy squeelings of her US contemporary Zephyr’s Candy Givens (if that’s possible), and nowadays sound wretchedly inappropriate and forced. Furthermore, elsewhere Carmen Maki sounds almost autistically restrained and Sade-like (yup, I’m not shitting you) compared to the brilliantly orgasmic and heart-stopping interpretations of Janis’ (and Jimi’s) work that Flowers’ singer Lemi Aso had achieved eighteen months before, on The Flowers’ excellent LP CHALLENGE! The end of 1971 saw the release of BLUES CREATION LIVE, the sleeve of which featured just the long-haired Takeda in a wide-brimmed floppy hat, re-inforcing the idea that this was really just a vehicle for the guitarist’s talents.

This album was recorded at the Japan Folk Jamboree, and is a full-on gem of a record, but Takeda was now widely known as a true Japanese guitar hero, and – as ever – had set his sights higher and higher. He split Blues Creation the following year, before splitting for London in late 1972. Outside of his Japanese environment, Takeda played many guitar sessions and slowly began to gain confidence in himself as a lead vocalist, so much so that when he returned to the Japanese music scene, in 1973, to support Mountain, it was as the lead singer/guitarist of a new power trio called simply Creation. The urbane and gregarious Takeda hit it off with Leslie West and Mountain drummer Corky Laing, but became even bigger mates with bassist Felix Pappalardi and his wife Gail Collins, who had written most of the lyrics for Mountain’s hits. However, Creation did not release their first LP until 1975, by which time Takeda – nervous of his new role as lead singer – invited rhythm guitarist Yoshiaki Iijima to join drummer Masayuki Higuchi and bassist Shigeru Matsumoto in the new line up. Unfortunately, like Jimmy Page, Tony Iommi and Jimi Hendrix, Kazuo Takeda is the last person to require a rhythm guitar player to flesh out his sound, and so the recorded results of this debut were overall pretty bland and homogenised, despite the LP having been produced by legendary Flower Travellin’ Band producer Yuya Utchida, and featuring a classic sleeve that featured eleven young boys having a pissing contest! Takeda was unhappy with the production and was determined that the next LP should be recorded in the USA. Takeda contacted Felix Pappalardi and asked him to produce the second Creation LP.

Pappalardi, temporarily deafened by the high volume at which Mountain always played concerts, had already decided to concentrate on studio production, and so he and his wife began to write songs with Takeda at their Nantucket home in Massachussets. In April 1976, the results were released in Japan as CREATION WITH FELIX PAPPALARDI and in the US as FELIX PAPPALARDI CREATION. Unfortunately, the international acclaim that Kazuo Takeda so longed for was still unforthcoming, although the record was once more a mighty success in Japan. The final Creation album PURE ELECTRIC SOUL was a live recording released in 1977, and its sleeve mirrored the band’s debut, again featuring a crowd of pre-teen boys crowding against the front windows of a bus. [julian Cope]

Apryl Fool - 1969 - Apryl Fool

Apryl Fool
1969
Apryl Fool




01. Tomorrow’s Child
02. Another Time
03. April Blues
04. The Lost Mother Land Pt.1
05. Tanger
06. Pledging My Time
07. Sunday
08. Honky Tonk Jam
09. The Lost Mother Land Pt.2



Hiroyoshi Yanagida – organ, piano
Eiji Kikuchi – lead guitar
Tadaki ‘Chu’ Kosaka – lead vocals
Haruomi Hosono – bass
Takashi Matsumoto – drums

The Apryl Fool was a very accomplished late-'60s band from Japan whose lone, self-titled album is a great mixture of hard psych and blues-rock. Their best-known track is probably "The Lost Mother Land, Pt. 1," which was featured on the Japanese volume of QDK's Love, Peace and Poetry series, certainly one of the most crazed, over the top productions and performances in the entire series, with its massively phased and treated vocals and general menace. But that tune is really the anomaly on the album, despite the prevalence of monstrous fuzz guitar on a number of tracks. At their heart, the Apryl Fool seem to be a blues-rock band, although one that was clearly experimenting with the burgeoning psychedelic scene. Tracks like "Another Time," "Honky Tonk Jam," and Bob Dylan's "Pledging My Time" are pretty straight blues-rock, and "April Blues" just adds some fuzz guitar to a boogie-woogie piano bit. The other tracks up the psych quotient considerably, like on "Tomorrow's Child," with its Farfisa and wicked fuzz leads, or the aforementioned "The Lost Mother Land, Pt. 1." There are additional crazy tape effects on "The Lost Mother Land, Pt. 2." About half the tunes are in English and half in Japanese, but it's all good stuff. Historical footnote: years later, bass player Haruomi Hosono would become a member of one of Japan's most popular music groups ever, Yellow Magic Orchestra.

Led by prime mover and ex-Floral organist Hiro Yaganida, the extremely cool and longhaired Apryl Fool quintet was one of the few New Rock bands even to approach the power and originality of their Western equivalents. Still suffering from weak-as-shit drumming and an inability to let go of their eary ‘60s influences, Apryl Fool nevertheless hit a coupla real peaks on their lone self-titled LP, released in 1969 on Nippon Columbia. For, while most of the record is perfunctory bar-room post-Animals blues, their attempt at real psychedelia on ‘The Lost Motherland’ does approach genuine meltdown, in much the same way as late ‘60s American LPs such as St. Stephen were want to do. If only there had been more of that stuff within the grooves, though… who really needed versions of Dylan’s ‘Pledging My Time’? Well, bass player Hosono and drummer Matsumoto, obviously, for the pair of them went in precisely that obvious direction with their next Band/Little Feat-styled project Happy End. And mightily successful they were, too. Nothing more was heard from lead guitarist Eiji Kikuchi, but vocalist Tadaki Kosaka joined the chorus of the musical HAIR. Keyboardist Yanagida also worked on HAIR, but in the far more lofty position of keyboard player in the house band. Thereafter, he recorded two solo LPs, MILK TIME and a self-titled second effort, as well as contributing major to the sessions for Love Live Life +1 and Foodbrain.

Sea Stone - 1978 - Mirrored Dreams

Sea Stone
1978
Mirrored Dreams




01. Brand New Day
02. Rolling Stone
03. Helping Hand
04. Waves Of Loneliness
05. Foolish Hero
06. Unborn Child
07. Precious Dreams
08. Wake Up

Originally released on the tiny Plankton label in a tiny run in 1978, this British quartet’s sole album was recorded over the preceding five years. Containing some intense jams with searing guitar leads from leader Simon Law, it is widely regarded as one of the best albums to have emerged from the 1970s Christian rock scene, and makes its long-awaited return to CD here.

Reissue on CD of ultra rare 1978 album by Christian progressive psych rock band from the U.K.
Great guitars and tones. Very cool-headed and stormless. When your in one of those relaxed and subdued moments, but still want to hear some nice guitars. Psych rock band from the U.K. Recorded between 1973 and 1977. The album was only released as a private pressing.

Pulse - 1971 - Pulse - Feat.Carlo Mastrangelo

Pulse
1971
Pulse - Feat.Carlo Mastrangelo





01. Understanding
02. Peace I
03. I Want To Live
04. I’ll Cry Tomorrow
05. Why Can’t She See Me?
06. Peace II
07. She’s Coming Home
08. Break Of day
09. Long Ago
10. Peace III

‘A decent early 70s hard rock group with driving organ and fuzz guitar’ – Fuzz, Acid & Flowers

 Pulse was led by Bronx born songwriter, drummer and vocalist Carlo Mastrangelo, who'd been a founder member of Dion and The Belmonts, with whom he sang, bass and drummed. As such he was on the poorly orfanized ill-fated tour during which Buddy Holly was killed in February 1959 (it has been reported that the bus they usually travelled on was so cold that Mastrangelo had to light newspapers in the aisle for woarmth). Dion later recalled that Holly was so impressed by  Mastrangelo's drumming that he'd offered him twice what he was being paid to defect to him.

After the Belmonts split in 1963, Mastrangelo recorded a few solo 45s on Laurie, the worked with bands named The Demilles and Carlo's Crown Jewel (who issued a 45 on Tower later in the decade).

Pulse are through to have been intially called Endless Pulse, and had a hard rock sound far removed from the Belmonts' doo-woop ballads. The quartet consisted of Mastrangelo Vovals, Drums, Richie Goggin Guitars, Vocals, Kenny Sambolin Bass, Vocals and Chris Gentile Organ, though Bill Golden also contributed some Keyboard parts.

Their sole LP was recorded in New York late in 1971, and its producer was the legendary Orrin Keepnews (who'd been responsible for jazz classics by Bill Evans, Thelonius Monk, Wes Montgomery and many others.) Issued on the tiny Thimble label in the spring of 1972, it sank like a stone, through it stands up well today.

The band issued no further recordings, though Sambolin is known to have continued in the music industry, penning for Mahogany Rush in the early '80's, while Mastrangelo currently lives in West Palm Beach Florida, and continues to play Drums.


Penny Nichols - 1968 - Pennys Arcade

Penny Nichols
1968
Pennys Arcade




01. Wash Day
02. Moon Song
03. Color Of Love
04. Games
05. Salton Sea Song
06. Sunshine Blues
07. Rainy Days
08. Summer Rain
09. Yellow Chimes
10. Look Around Rock
11. Mountain Song
12. Holy Holy
13. Farina


As part of California’s emerging 1960s folk-rock scene, Penny Nichols honed her musical talents alongside her friends Tim Buckley, Jackson Browne and Linda Ronstadt. This classic 1968 collection was her only contemporary release, and features support from Bob Dylan sidemen Bruce Langhorne and Al Gorgoni as well as members of psychedelic favourites the Peanut Butter Conspiracy. An enjoyable fusion of folk, pop, jazz and psychedelia, it’s a neglected gem that will appeal to all fans of quality singer-songwriting.

Penny Nichols grew up in Southern California, and had become a regular on the folk coffee-house circuit by the mid-1960s, playing with future legends such as Tim Buckley, Jackson Browne, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Linda Ronstadt as well as also-rans such as Spencer Perskin (later of Shiva’s Headband) and Steve Noonan. Having moved to Sausalito, honed her songwriting and become a regular in its folk clubs, she played the legendary Big Sur folk festival in the summer of 1967 (alongside Joan Baez and Judy Collins), as well as undertaking gigs with Steve Miller, the Jefferson Airplane and others. Towards the end of the year she began work in New York and Los Angeles on Penny’s Arcade. Produced by Elektra’s ‘house hippy’ Billy James and Buddah Records head Artie Ripp, it features backing from members of the Peanut Butter Conspiracy (whom James managed) as well as session heavyweights such as Bruce Langhorne (Bob Dylan, Richie Havens, Fred Neil, Tom Rush, John Sebastian) and Al Gorgoni (Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Carole King, Laura Nyro). A delightful mixture of wistful folk, melodic pop and hazy psychedelic jazz, it was issued in a heavy gatefold sleeve with a four-page booklet extolling Nichols’ virtues, but failed to make her the star she could have been.

In March 1968, around the time Penny’s Arcade appeared, she played the Fillmore with Traffic, Blue Cheer and H. P. Lovecraft, but instead of releasing a follow-up she decided to visit Europe in the winter of 1968. She stayed with George and Patti Harrison and recorded still-unissued sessions at Apple in London, but eventually returned to California to focus on work as a session singer and vocal arranger. Having worked with artists including Arlo Guthrie, Art Garfunkel, Susie Quatro, Donna Summer and Jimmy Buffett, she became an expert on pitch perception and earned a doctoral degree from Harvard’s School of Education in 1991. She hosts regular singing and songwriting workshops for people of all ages, as well as making educational videos and tapes and releasing sporadic records (including her 1990 sophomore effort All Life Is One and 1993’s Jataka Tales, based on ancient Buddhist stories). Still an active and popular singer-songwriter, it is to be hoped that this first full CD reissue of Penny’s Arcade will finally establish its credentials as an overlooked piece of the late 60s Californian folk-rock jigsaw.
All songs by Penny Nichols

Recorded in New York and Los Angeles

Produced by Artie Ripp and Billy James

Arranged by Artie Butler (NY) / Bruce Langhorne (LA)

Engineered by Torrie Brainard (Bell Sound, NY) / Don Blake and John Haeny (United, LA) / Brian Bruderlin (Paramount, LA)

Vocals and guitar by Penny Nichols
Piano by Artie Butler (NY) and Grant Johnson (LA)
Flute by Joe Grimm
Guitars by Sal di Troia, Al Gorgoni & Vincent Bell (NY) / John Merrill & Bruce Langhorne (LA)
Electric bass by Joseph Macho Jr. (NY) / Alan Brackett & Kerry Magness (LA)
Bass by Richard Romoff & Julie Ruggiero (NY)
Drums by Alvin Rogers (NY) / Sanford Konikoff, Jimmie Smith & John Kelihor (LA)

Original album design by Kittyhawk Graphics

Nucleus - 1969 - Nucleus

Nucleus
1969
Nucleus





01. Jenny Wake Up
02. All About Me And The Spidery Bass
03. Judgment Day
04. Lost And Found
05. Share Your Colour
06. Communication

Not to be confused with the British act of the same name, this Canadian quintet arose from the ashes of one of Toronto’s most popular 60s bands, The Lords Of London. Their sole album originally appeared in April 1969, and features intense jamming, with plenty of swirling organ and tough guitar. When it failed to sell, they split, with three members going on to form 1970s hitmakers A Foot In Coldwater.


Mutzie - 1970 - Light Of Your Shadow

Mutzie
1970
Light Of Your Shadow





01. Highway
02. The Light Of Your Shadow in two movements
       a) The Inception (including the transition)
       b) The Consummation (including the judgment)
03. Cocaine Blues
04. Jessie Fly
05. Because Of You
06. The Game
07. Daily Cycle

Spawned by the same scene that threw out the Stooges, the MC5 and Bob Seger, this Detroit quartet made only one record, which originally appeared in August 1970. A heady brew of hard rock, blues, jazz and funk, it sold poorly, meaning that the band (who shared stages with the Allman Brothers, Johnny Winter, Alice Cooper and many other leading acts of the era) splintered soon afterwards, leaving behind just one lost gem.


Moloch - 1970 - Moloch

Moloch
1970
Moloch





01. Helping Hand
02. Maverick Woman Blues
03. Outta Hand
04. Same Old Blues
05. Going Down
06. She Looks Like An Angel
07. Gone Too Long
08. Dance Chaney Dance
09. Mona
10. People Keep Talking
11. I Can Think The Same Of You
12. Night At The Possum
Bonus tracks
13. Cocaine Katy
14. The Terrorizing Of Miss Nancy Jane

Produced by Don Nix (widely credited as a key architect of the ‘Memphis Sound’), this hard-hitting collection of bluesy acid rock first appeared on Stax subsidiary Enterprise in 1970. Featuring the outstanding guitar playing of the late Lee Baker (later to play with Alex Chilton) and the original version of Going Down (covered by Freddie King, Jeff Beck, Pearl Jam, JJ Cale and others), the album makes its CD debut here, complete with two rare bonus tracks, and is an essential purchase for all fans of blues-influenced rock and roll.

Moloch emerged from the fertile music scene in Memphis, Tennessee in 1969. Led by guitarist Lee Baker (who had played with the Memphis Blazers throughout the decade, toured with the Mar-Keys and is often called ‘the greatest guitarist you’ve never heard of’), they gigged alongside the MC5 and the Stooges and were offered the opportunity to make an album for local Stax subsidiary Enterprise in 1970. Recorded at the legendary Ardent studios with local producer Don Nix (a collaborator with Lonnie Mack, Furry Lewis, Freddy King, Albert King, Delaney & Bonnie, Isaac Hayes, The Staple Singers and others, and often credited as a key architect of the ‘Memphis Sound’), they laid down a rich stew of 12-bar blues peppered with fiery guitar, fat organ and taut drumming. Though the bulk of the songs were penned by Nix (including the original version of Goin' Down, later to become a blues standard covered by Eric Clapton, Freddie King, Deep Purple, Pearl Jam and others), the sound is unmistakably theirs, and betrays the influence of the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Blue Cheer as well as blues musicians like Mississippi Fred McDowell, Sleepy John Estes and Bukka White (all of whom Baker had played with at the legendary Memphis Country Blues Festivals of the late 60s).

The album was a triumph, but failed to sell, prompting the band to split in 1971. The following year, Baker assembled another version of Moloch (featuring bassist Michael Jones, later to play with Talking Heads) and released a one-off 45 on a tiny local label called Booger. This featured even more vicious guitar than the LP, but was doomed to obscurity from the start. Baker went on to play with fellow local hero Alex Chilton (whose Big Star were to suffer a similar fate to Moloch on another Stax subsidiary, Ardent), contributing guitar to his legendary Third / Sister Lovers LP and the Like Flies On Sherbet album later in the decade. Baker also formed Mudboy & the Neutrons with friends Jim Dickinson, Sid Selvidge and Jimmy Crosthwait (dubbed ‘the great band that nobody can find’ by Bob Dylan), and collaborated extensively with pioneering blues guitarist Furry Lewis. He was still prominent on the Memphis music scene when he was senselessly murdered in September 1996, and it is to be hoped that this reissue will bring his astonishing guitar player to a wider audience.



Tracks 1-12: Lee Baker – guitar, vocals / Gene Wilkins – vocals / Fred Nicholson – organ / Steve Spear – bass / Philip Durham – drums, vocals. Produced, arranged & engineered by Don Nix at at Ardent Studios. Remix engineer – John Fry. Photography by Ted Bruehl and Jimmy Chappe.

Tracks 13-14: Lee Baker - lead guitar, vocals / Gene Wilkins – vocals / Jimmy Segerson – rhythm guitar / Michael ‘Busta Cherry’ Jones – bass / Bobby Dodds – drums. Recorded in Memphis, 1972.

Melchior Alias - 1969 - Melchior Alias..

Melchior Alias
1969
Melchior Alias...




01. Chu Mnu en Métro Automatique
02. Moto Perpetuo
03. Itineraire 9
04. Camping
05. Triste Narcisse
06. Une Facon De Parler
07. L'Espace d'un Été
08. Totor Melchior
09. L'Aquarium
10. Non, Rien De Mieux


This French-Canadian ultra-rarity makes its long-overdue CD debut here. Originally issued in 1969, it’s a crazed blend of catchy pop, funky grooves and spaced-out psychedelia, with plenty of acid guitar. The identity of the enigmatic Melchior Alias remains unknown, but numerous leading lights of Quebec’s progressive music scene are involved, including arranger and future disco luminary Denis Lepage and engineer Peter Tessier (later to make his own rare album). It seems likely that the credit for Robert Goulet as musical director is a joke – but anything seems possible on this most strange and mysterious of discs.



Lorri Zimmerman - 1969 - Lorri Zimmerman

Lorri Zimmerman
1969
Lorri Zimmerman





01. Don’t Twist My Mind
02. You’re The One
03. Contemplation
04. Bidin’ My Time
05. Just To Say Goodbye
06. Theme For An Imaginary Western
07. Cause The World Is Mine
08. Paint Me A Picture
09. Love Me, Love My Children
10. Children Of The Universe

Having sung with Canadian hippie rockers Life, this superb vocalist recorded her only solo album for the tiny Crescent Street label in 1969. Alternating between tender ballads and psych-tinged rock, it’s a consistently strong set that has long been a well-kept secret amongst underground music connoisseurs. Zimmerman went on to tour as a backing singer for Leonard Cohen before forming pop-rockers Toulouse in the mid-70s - but it’s this rare album that best showcases her powerful, affecting voice.